Author Archives: admin

Summertime Reading

“A book worth reading is a book worth owning.” So said my dad. That mantra seems to have rubbed off on me, as the stacks of books at home and in my office can attest. While my historical tastes span … Continue reading

Posted in Books, Programs, Public Programs, Seminars, Teacher History Workshops | Comments Off on Summertime Reading

Robert Fairchild and His Powder Horn

Powder horns are unique artifacts in that they have the ability to speak to a single person’s 18th-century military service unlike most other objects.  Muskets, swords, and other similar items, though important, are rarely able to connect people today nearly … Continue reading

Posted in Collections, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Robert Fairchild and His Powder Horn

Lake George, Lake Champlain, and Their Importance Today

Memorial Day Weekend typically kicks-off the summer season in the Lake George/Lake Champlain region. This past Memorial Day Weekend was more winter-like for many of us, with a cold rain and day-time temperatures in the low to mid-forties. Up north, … Continue reading

Posted in Artworks, Landscape, Public Programs, Seminars | Comments Off on Lake George, Lake Champlain, and Their Importance Today

Building the Giberne, Part 2

The red leather that gives the giberne its notable color in the 1757 watercolors is Russia leather, a hard-wearing upholstery leather. This leather was extremely popular through the 18th and 19th century due the preservative effects of the Russian birch … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Building the Giberne, Part 2

Wild French Food in 1755

The past two years visitors often asked, “Did they hunt for their food?” in reference to the historical soldiers we portrayed at Fort Ticonderoga. For the men of Colonel Williard’s 1759Massachusettsprovincial regiment who we portrayed in 2011, the answer was … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Wild French Food in 1755

Encouraging a Passion for History

Earlier this week I travelled to Cooperstown to participate as a judge at New York State History Day. Sponsored by the New York State Historical Association, New York State History Day serves thousands of students in hundreds of school districts … Continue reading

Posted in National History Day, Programs, Scouts, Students, Students History, Teacher History Workshops | Comments Off on Encouraging a Passion for History

King’s Garden Volunteers Welcome

  It’s always a pleasure to discover a plant growing in an unexpected place among purposefully placed plants in the garden.  These “volunteers” are nature’s gift to the gardener, the product of prolific re-seeders, birds or small mammals leaving seeds behind, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on King’s Garden Volunteers Welcome

Teachers as Students

There’s a saying that “teachers make the worst students.” This hasn’t been my experience at Fort Ticonderoga. Over the past several years I’ve had the pleasure of working with a number of dedicated, innovative teachers as part of my job … Continue reading

Posted in Teacher History Workshops | Comments Off on Teachers as Students

Building the Giberne, Part 1

One of the essential articles needed to portray soldiers of the Languedoc regiment at Ticonderoga in 1755 are cartridge pouches. These cartridge pouches or, ‘cartouches,’ were properly called, ‘gibernes,‘ for French regular army soldiers. Much like English cartridge pouches; these … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Building the Giberne, Part 1

Ready, Set, Garden!

  The word “spring” conjures up many pictures – green grass, the arrival of migrating songbirds, warm sunshine, and of course, flowers!  Classics like tulips, daffodils, and grape hyacinths are starting to peek through the soil to color the landscape.  … Continue reading

Posted in Horticulture, King's Garden | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Ready, Set, Garden!