Area Students Advance to New York State History Day

What a great day! Thirty middle and high school students from the North Country won top prizes at North Country History Day on Saturday, March 8th, at Fort Ticonderoga’s Deborah Clarke Mars Education Center. These students will advance to compete at New York State History Day in Cooperstown on April 28th.

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Judges review student exhibits during North Country History Day March 8th.

Not only was it exciting to see student projects, but it was great to see students from throughout the region sharing with each other their common interest in history and what history can teach us about ourselves. Each and every student participant invested a great deal of time and energy in historical research and creating compelling projects reflecting this year’s theme of Rights and Responsibilities in History.

Junior Division (Grades 6-8) North Country Regional winners include:

  • Grace Sayward and Aileen Crain, from a home school group in Champlain, New York, took first place in the Group Performance category with their performance “Mill Girls of Lowell.” Amanda Ennis and Samantha Boyea, from Greenwich Central School, took second place with their performance “Carson’s Controversy.”

    Francis Kneussle's Junior Individual Exhibit on "The Feudal System."

    Francis Kneussle’s Junior Individual Exhibit on “The Feudal System.”

  • Francis Kneussle, from Peru Middle School, took first place in the Individual Exhibit category with his exhibit “The Feudal System: A Hierarchy of Power and Privilege.” Michael Casey, from Greenwich Central School, took second place with his exhibit “The Slave Amendments: How They Gave the Slaves Rights.”
  • Talandra Hurlburt and Brooke Lauzon, from St. Mary’s School in Ticonderoga, took first place in the Group Exhibit category with their exhibit “Rights and Responsibilities of Athens and Greece.” Sophie Bryant and Samantha Staples, from Moriah Central School, took second place with their exhibit “Rights and Responsibilities of the Roman Empire.”
  • Ben Caito and Liam Sayward, from a home school group in Champlain, New York, took first place in the Group Web Site Category with their web site “Maximilien Robespierre’s Changing Position on the Right-to-Life vs. Thomas Paine’s Unchanging Commitment.”

Senior Division (Grades 9-12) North Country Regional winners include:

  • Janelle Williams, from Greenwich Central School, took first place in the Historical Paper category with her paper “Sacco and Vanzetti: A Case of Immigrant Rights.” Christopher VanDerwerker, from Greenwich Central School, took second place with his paper “Rights and Responsibilities during the Philippine-American War.”
  • Jamie Vogt and Taylor Morse, from Peru High School, took first place in the Group Documentary category with their documentary “No More Miss America!”
  • Jarron Boyle, Tanner Conley, and Tanner Whalen, from Moriah Central School, took first place in the Group Performance category with their performance “Abortion Debate.”
  • Karla Hayes, from Moriah Central School, took first place in the Individual Exhibit category with her exhibit “Human Trafficking: Rights and Responsibilities of Mankind.”
  • Ethan Depo and Darcy Smith, from Peru High School, took first place in the Group Exhibit category with their exhibit “The Brady Bill: A Stepping Stone for Gun Control.” Christina Lashway, Alexandra Lashway, Nick Manfred, Alice Cochran, and Shonna Provoncha took second place for their exhibit “Nuclear Energy: Advance without Imperilment.”
  • Dylan Scozzafava, Jonathan Brassard, Kyle Gifaldi, Cole Gaddor, and Thomas Yakalis, from Moriah Central School, took first place in the Group Website category with their web site “Arms: Rights or Responsibilities.”

A special prize for the best use of primary sources, sponsored by the “Ticonderoga, the First 250 Years” Committee, was awarded to Grace Sayward and Aileen Crain, from a home school group in Champlain, New York, for their Group Performance “Mill Girls of Lowell.”

Participating schools included Greenwich Central School, Moriah Central School, Peru High School, Peru Middle School, and St. Mary’s School (Ticonderoga) as well as home school students from the Champlain, New York area. A total of 66 students with 36 entries participated in North Country Regional History Day.

National History Day is the nation’s leading program for history education in schools. The program annually engages 2 million people in 48 states, the District of Columbia, and Guam. Students research history topics of their choice related to an annual theme and create exhibits, documentaries, performances, research papers, and website designs. They may enter in competition at the regional, state, and national level. Participants include students in grades 6-8 in the Junior Division and grades 9-12 in the Senior Division. National History Day also provides educational services to students and teachers, including a summer internship program, curricular materials, internet resources, and annual teacher workshops and training institutes. Fort Ticonderoga hosts teacher workshops about History Day each fall in the North Country and Regional Coordinator Rich Strum is available to meet with teachers at their schools to introduce the program. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal in 2011, “Students who participate in National History Day—actually a year-long program that gets students in grades 6-12 doing historical research—consistently outperform their peers on state standardized tests, not only in social studies but in science and math as well.”

Teachers and students from Clinton, Essex, Franklin, and Warren counties interested in participating in North Country History Day during the 2014-15 school year should go to our History Day web page.

Rich Strum, Director of Education

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Delving Into the Year 1776 with Educators

I am looking forward to this summer when we have a number of opportunities for educators to spend in-depth time at Fort Ticonderoga exploring various topics. We are now accepting applications from teachers to participate in the 2014 Fort Ticonderoga Teacher Institute July 13-17, 2014. The focus of this year’s institute is “1776 at Ticonderoga” and will accommodate 14 teachers for a week-long exploration of the critical year of Independence as it unfolded at Fort Ticonderoga. Applications are due April 15th.

2013 Fort Ticonderoga Teacher Institute participants pose on Mount Defiance at the beginning of their week.

2013 Fort Ticonderoga Teacher Institute participants pose on Mount Defiance at the beginning of their week.

The Fort Ticonderoga Teacher Institute is a great addition to our annual programs for educators. This important program builds on the success of our first teacher institute in 2013 and our on-going experience with the National Endowment for the Humanities teacher workshops we’ve hosted.

Fort Ticonderoga is thrilled to offer this unique opportunity for a small group of teachers to spend a week digging into the wealth of documents, objects, and material culture related to a specific year at Fort Ticonderoga. Full-time classroom teachers and school librarians in public, charter, independent, and religiously-affiliated schools are eligible to apply. Our growing partnership with the College of St. Joseph in Vermont gives participating teachers the opportunity to earn three graduate credits upon completion of the designated project. Fort Ticonderoga offers this week-long experience with limited out-of-pocket costs for teachers.

During the course of the week, teachers will work with author and historian James L. Nelson. They will explore topics related to the failed invasion of Canada and the subsequent retreat to Ticonderoga, the structure of the Continental Army, the construction and manning of a fleet to protect Lake Champlain, and how the events of 1776 at Ticonderoga helped lay the groundwork for a stunning American victory at Saratoga the following year.

Rowing a Bateau

Educators in a past Teacher Institute crew the Fort’s 30-foot bateau.

Teachers will work with original documents in the Fort Ticonderoga collection. Tim Potts, Past President of the New York State Council for the Social Studies, will interact with teachers throughout the week, leading them through pedagogical activities applicable in the classroom.

Several immersive experiences will allow teachers a greater appreciation of the day to day work of Continental soldiers that served at Ticonderoga in 1776. Teahers will become the crew of a 30-foot bateau on Lake Champlain, take part in wood-working activities, and cook a meal in an 18th-century field kitchen.

Interested teachers can learn more by visiting Fort Ticonderoga’s website at this link.

Rich Strum
Director of Education

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Grow a Salad Quilt

It’s a real treat to make a trip to the garden with basket in hand to pick fresh greens for a salad.  I like to pick enough for just a day or two at a time so the greens are as crisp as possible.  Are you planning to grow vegetables this season?  Here’s an idea from the King’s Garden that challenges you to think “inside the box” when planting your lettuce patch.  The “Salad Quilt” is a feature planned for the Children’s Garden that has been a visitor favorite in the past.

Salad quilt plan image
Layout for “Salad Quilt”

Start with a prepared seed bed (ours is 6 feet square), but you can modify the size to suit your needs.  Bamboo stakes are perfect for laying out the perimeter and the lines that will form the “patches.”  Each type of vegetable is planted in a 2’x2′ square.  Leaving the stakes in place reinforces the geometric pattern.  Sow thickly; you can thin the crop as they grow in and those unwanted seedlings will be the first harvest.  Follow sowing directions on the individual packets; you want to use closer than recommended spacing for the best effect.  Use an intensive gardening method where the center of one plant is the same distance from the centers of plants on all sides of it.  However, plants should not be crowded to the point at which disease problems arise or competition causes stunting.

A variety of lettuces, plus spinach, chard, arugula, kale and other leafy greens were chosen for this year’s display.  Be creative!  Think leaf color, shape and texture when designing your quilt.  The inspiration for me comes from Victorian-style carpet bedding where colorful foliage plants are spaced closely together form a picture.  Frequent harvesting yields the tenderest leaves and keeps the look neat.

More inspiration: Colorful lettuce display at Montreal Botanic Garden

More inspiration: Colorful lettuce display at Montreal Botanic Garden

Your patchwork garden should produce regularly for weeks until the heat of summer takes hold.  These greens are cool weather crops, meaning that they thrive in temperatures between 60 and 65 degrees but are intolerant of high summer temperatures.  A second sowing in early August (for us northerners) is possible for late summer and fall harvesting.  This can be a little tricky if the temperatures haven’t moderated, but picking salad greens in October is very rewarding!  Another option is to sow a fall crop of beets and carrots in the space.

Be sure to visit the gardens early in the season to see our colorful quilt.  The King’s Garden opens on Saturday, May 24th, and the tasty greens should be ready to be turned into delicious salads in the America’s Fort Café beginning in early June.  Get ready to say bon appétit!

Heidi teRiele Karkoski
Director of Horticulture

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North Country History Day is More than “a Day”

Next month 66 students from across northern New York will compete at North Country History Day held here at Fort Ticonderoga. Students placing first and second in their categories on March 8th will advance to represent the region at New York State History Day in Cooperstown on April 28th.

Student winner of an award "Best Use of Primary Sources" at North Country History Day 2013. The award was sponsored by the "Ticonderoga, the First 250 Years" committee.

Student winner of an award “Best Use of Primary Sources” at North Country History Day 2013. The award was sponsored by the “Ticonderoga, the First 250 Years” committee.

Each year two million students all across the country participate in the National History Day program. Students research history topics of their choice related to an annual theme and create exhibits, documentaries, performances, research papers, and website designs. They may enter in competition at the regional, state, and national level. Participants include students in grades 6-8 in the Junior Division and grades 9-12 in the Senior Division. National History Day also provides educational services to students and teachers, including a summer internship program, curricular materials, internet resources, and annual teacher workshops and training institutes.

This year’s National History Day theme is “Rights and Responsibilities in History.” Student projects can focus on any aspect of American or World history, but must make a connection to the theme.

Recent research shows that students who participate in the National History Day program consistently out perform their peers in state standardized tests, not only in social studies but in science and math as well! Students learn valuable research and critical-thinking skills essential to success in today’s business world.

A judge examines a student exhibit entry at North Country History Day in 2013.

A judge examines a student exhibit entry at North Country History Day in 2013.

Eighteen volunteers help make History Day happen at Fort Ticonderoga. These members of the regional community serve as judges, diligently viewing student projects, providing constructive feedback and interviewing each student participant.

Members of the public are invited to view student projects between 12:30 and 3:00. Student-created performances run from 12:30-1:30 and exhibits are open from 1:30-3:00. The public can also attend the Awards Ceremony at 3:00. North Country History Day takes place in the Deborah Clarke Mars Education Center at Fort Ticonderoga and has been coordinated by the Fort since 2008.

Click here to learn more about North Country History Day and how students can participate.

I invite you to come and see the great work in history our regional students are doing!

Rich Strum
Director of Education and
North Country Regional Coordinator for New York State History Day

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Of Love, Duty, and Affection

Our team spends a lot of time talking about the power of Fort Ticonderoga’s stories. Fort Ticonderoga’s history is epic and pivotal in the French & Indian War and American Revolution. It was the key to the continent. It is also the site of landmark preservation and heritage tourism in the 19th century and monumental restoration in the 20th century.

This letter written by Alexander Scammell to Naby Bishop in 1777 is owned by the Fort Ticonderoga Museum

This letter written by Alexander Scammell to Naby Bishop in 1777 is owned by the Fort Ticonderoga Museum

As you pull back the curtain on the broad historical (and powerful!) themes, you will find very personal and intimate stories. Stories that highlight emotions that transcend time and connect us as people to the past to those who loved, struggled, hoped, and sacrificed.

In the spirit of Valentines Day here is a love letter written by Alexander Scammell to his love Naby Bishop in 1777 from Ticonderoga. Scammell shares his deep affection with Naby, his longing desire to be with her, and his devotion to his country in the fight for liberty.

Scammel was born in Mendon, Massachusetts in 1747, was a Harvard educated attorney, and an officer in the Continental Army in the Revolutionary War. He was wounded on September 30, 1781 near Yorktown and died on October 6 in Williamsburg, Virginia making him the highest ranking American officer killed at the siege of Yorktown.

(Ticonderoga)
June 8th 1777

My Dearest Naby,
After a very severe march one hundred miles of the way on foot, through the woods in an excessive miry Road, wet, rainy weather accompanied with Snow and Hail, I arrived the 20th of May at Ticonderoga. Am now stationed at what is called the French Lines, where the British army last war met with such a fatal defeat, and lost so many men and if they make an attempt upon us in the same place I nothing doubt we shall be able by the smiles of superintendant Providence to give them as fatal an overthrow—Our men are well supplied, and I am of opinion will behave well—The blood of our murdered countrymen cry for Vengeance on those British villains and I hope we shall be the just Instruments of revenge. Though I should much rather be able to retire to enjoy the sweets of Liberty and domestic happiness, but more especially the pleasing Charms of your dear Company. But as long as my Country demands my utmost Exertions, I must devote myself, entirely to its Service –though and worthy sett of Officers—But my men are undisciplined, they are exposed to severe Duty, many of them sick and put poorly covered. They look up to me as a common father, and you may well Judge of my disagreeable sensations, when I am unable to afford them, or procure wherewithal to make them comfortable. However, I shall endeavor to do all that I can for them, and if possible make them pay me ready and implicit Obedience, through Love and Affection, rather than through Fear and Dread. We at present have a very agreeable & healthy Situation—In good Spirits, and have good provisions—And hope early next Fall or Winter to do myself the pleasure of waiting upon you at Mystic unless you should forbid it. The tender moments which we have spent together still, and ever will remain fresh in my memory—You are ever present in my enraptured heart– & a mutual return of Affection from you I find more and more necessary to my Happiness—cherish the Love my dearest Naby, which you have so generously professed for me – Although I am far distant from you, still remember that I am your constant, and most affectionate admirer—I should have wrote you sooner, but being ordered upon the disagreeable Command of sitting as president of a General Court Martial to try men for their Lives, many of which have justly forfeited them and to try several Villains who have attempted to spread small Pox —I assure you that it is a most trying Birth, and has worried my mind more than any command I was ever upon—But hope I shall ever be able to discharge my Duty in such a manner as never to be subject to any and this is the first opportunity I had of writing to you—I hope therefore that you will not impute any neglect to me but ever consider me unalterably thine –My Lovely Girl, write every Opportunity to

Your Alexander Scammell

Write to me every Opportunity Miss Naby Bishop

P.S. I long for the time when through you I can send my dutiful regards to you honored parents by the tender Name of Father & Mother
June 23rd, 1777

I congratulate you upon the Cause of your Fear being removed as Burgoyne is going to attack Ticonderoga & not Boston –I hope we shall be able to keep him off.

Writen by Beth Hill, President and CEO, Fort Ticonderoga

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112 Teacher Scholarships and Counting

It’s hard to believe that since 2001, Fort Ticonderoga has provided scholarships for 112 teachers to attend its seminars and symposia at no cost. Scholarship winners have come from 17 different states and two Canadian provinces. Of those 112 scholarships, 60 have been for the Fort’s oldest seminar, the War College of the Seven Years’ War.

Fort Ticonderoga is pleased to offer scholarships for four teachers at the middle school or high school level to attend this year’s annual War College of the Seven Years’ War, to be held May 16-18, 2014. This annual seminar focuses on the French & Indian War in North America (1754-1763), bringing together a panel of distinguished historians from around the country and beyond. The War College takes place in the Deborah Clarke Mars Education Center and is open to the public; pre-registration is required. The scholarships are available for educators who are first-time attendees at the War College.

Begun in 1996, the War College of the Seven Years’ War has become one of the premier seminars on the French & Indian War in the country. It features a mix of new and established scholars in an informal setting for a weekend of presentations related to the military, social, and cultural history of the French & Indian War. Since 2001, Fort Ticonderoga has provided scholarships for 60 teachers from across the country to attend the War College, and a total of 112 teacher scholarships to attend seminars and conferences at the Fort.

Teachers interested in applying for a scholarship to attend this year’s War College of the Seven Years’ War should download an application here. Applications are due by March 15th. Successful applicants will receive free registration, two box lunches, and an opportunity to dine with the War College speakers at a private dinner the Saturday of the War College.

The War College is open to the general public. The cost is $120 if registering before March 15th; $145 after that date. There are additional discounts for members of the Friends of Fort Ticonderoga. Registration forms can be downloaded here.

I look forward to seeing you at the Nineteenth Annual War College of the Seven Years’ War at Fort Ticonderoga this May!

Rich Strum

Director of Education

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“A Day Longer in the Field” Explores Lives of Provincial Soldiers at Fort Ticonderoga’s Upcoming Living History Weekend, Feb 15-16

“A Day Longer in the Field” living history event will take place at Fort Ticonderoga February 15-16, 2014.

“A Day Longer in the Field” living history event will take place at Fort Ticonderoga February 15-16, 2014.

“A Day Longer in the Field”

Fort Ticonderoga will once again be alive with its premier interpretive programming during its next living history weekend, Saturday and Sunday, February 15-16 from 10 am until 4pm each day. The event will highlight the lives of Massachusetts provincial soldiers garrisoned at Fort Ticonderoga in 1759. The cost for the event is $10 per person and payable at the gate. Friends of Fort Ticonderoga and children 4 years old and under are free. For more details visit www.fortticonderoga.org or call 518-585-2821.

Guests will stand shoulder to shoulder with costumed interpretive staff as they portray American Provincial soldiers facing the challenges of daily life as a soldier at Ticonderoga during the French and Indian war. The weekend-long event will include special tours highlighting General Amherst’s army and the campaign of 1759. Interactive programs will feature soldier’s life activities including cooking, carpentry, tailoring, shoemaking, and maintenance of weapons. A guest favorite, Fort Ticonderoga’s highly acclaimed musket demonstration, will be offered several times throughout the weekend and will demonstrate how provincial soldiers, using an array of British army muskets, civilian fowlers, and captured French fusils, used their firelocks.

Recently featured in Travel and Leisure’s America’s Best Winter Rides, Fort Ticonderoga’s winter programs offer guests an intimate historic experience at one of America’s most beautiful and historically significant locations. During these winter programs guests are immersed in specific moments in our remarkable past, interact with talented staff that bring the Fort’s history to life in dramatic new ways, and will truly feel the power of the site in the midst of the quiet and rugged winter beauty at Ticonderoga.

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Sharing Ideas about Colonial American History

On Friday, May 16, 2014, Fort Ticonderoga hosts its Sixth Annual Colonial America Conference for Educators. This day-long conference takes place in the Deborah Clarke Mars Education Center. While intended for educators, the conference is open to anyone with an interest in helping connect students with history.

Our conference focuses on the period 1609-1783 and features presentations by classroom teachers, museum educators, and archivists. It has been gratifying to watch this conference evolve and grow since its inception in 2009. The number of classroom teachers presenting has grown each year. It’s exciting to have enthusiastic teachers share their classroom successes with fellow educators.

This year’s presentations include:

  • Historians in the Classroom: Creating Authentic Learning Experiences with Document Sets. This session will demonstrate how to create authentic learning experiences for students by grouping multiple primary sources into document sets. The document set format consists of an essential question, historical documents related to the essential question, and an assessment of student learning. This workshop will walk participants through a series of document sets that explore the causes, effects, and significant events of the American Revolution. Participants will be given the opportunity to create their own document sets, essential questions and assessments. Copies of document sets will be given to all attendees. Julie Daniels is the coordinator of educational programs at the NYS Archives; Jessica Maul is an education consultant at the NYS Archives Partnership Trust.
  • Colonial Tea Party. Have you ever thought about what it would be like to go back in time to ask King George III how he felt when the colonists refused to pay his taxes, or ask John Burgoyne how he could have made his famous plan work? Your students will have the chance to do just that in the Colonial Tea Party. In this workshop, two team teachers (one English and one Social Studies) will walk attendees through the process of preparing students to conduct research on colonial figures, historical events that took place between 1763 and 1783, and the time period in general. Students will be engaged in reading leveled historical novels from the revolutionary war period to examine the factors leading up to the war itself from numerous perspectives. Then, students will select a historical figure that they will portray in the tea party. Leading up to the tea party, students will conduct research and complete several activities, including a character sketch, a colonial figure poster and poem, several historical journal entries, and a culminating letter of reflection after the tea party. So get ready to go back in time and help your students understand the dynamics of this tumultuous time period. Seth Harris teaches 7th grade social studies and Erin Mailloux teaches 7th grade English at Shaker Junior High School in Colonie, New York.
  • Early Colonial New York through Documents and Physical Resources: New France, New Amsterdam, and the Iroquois Confederacy. This session focuses on the early colonial relationship between the French, Dutch, and Iroquois as witnessed through primary sources. Special attention will be given to the use of documents and physical resources that are relevant to classroom instruction. Tom Henry is a retired teacher from the Liverpool School District. He is a former president of the Central New York Council for the Social Studies and New York State Social Studies Teacher of the Year. He currently teaches history in the Syracuse chapter of the Oasis program. Bill Perks is currently a social studies teacher in the Marathon School District. He is formerly the Director of Historical Interpretation at the St. Marie Among the Iroquois Living History Museum.
  • The French and Indian War in Pennsylvania. This presentation will give an overview of the major military events that occurred within Pennsylvania primarily from 1754 to 1758. The start of the war, Braddock’s Campaign, and the Forbes Campaign will be the major focal points. David P. Miller has been employed with the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission since 1998 and served as the Director of Education at Bushy Run Battlefield for 11 years.
  • The American Revolution through British Eyes. This session is about the often ignored lives of British soldiers in North America and their stories. Using Don Hagist’s non-fiction book, British Soldiers, American War: Voices of the American Revolution, participants will analyze up to nine biographies with primary source case studies to learn what life was like as a British soldier. Attendees will receive traditional and common core lesson plan strategies and formats to adapt to their classroom. Tim Potts has taught middle level Social Studies for 24 years at the Robert J. Kaiser Middle School in Monticello, New York. He is the immediate Past President of the New York State Council for Social Studies and was elected in 2012 to the steering committee of the National Council for Social Studies. Tim has presented at numerous local, state, and national conferences on innovative ways to teach Social Studies.
  • “Large Armies of foreign Mercenaries to complete the works of death, desolation, and tyranny”: A Review of German “Hessians” who Served in the American War for Independence. This program will address the generalities of German “Hessian mercenaries” who served during the American War for Independence. Focus will be made on their nation states of origin, organization, reasons for being involved in the war, and their feelings concerning it. Centuries-old stereotyping will be addressed. Primary focus will be on those Germans who served in the Northern Campaign of 1777. Eric Schnitzer has been the park ranger/historian at Saratoga National Historical Park for 18 years; among his areas of study are the people—officers, men, and followers—who served in the Northern Campaign of 1777.

The Sixth Annual Colonial America Conference for Educators takes place on the Friday of War College weekend. The registration fee for participants is $40. For those also taking part in the War College of the Seven Years’ War (May 16-18, 2014), the cost of attending the conference is $35. You can download a flyer and registration form from our website.

Please share this information with educators you know—and even if you are not an educator, you are welcome to join us for this day of sharing ideas and digging deeper into our colonial history.

Rich Strum
Director of Education

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Rub Elbows with Expert Gardeners

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt’s the time of year for gardeners to start gearing up for the growing season: ordering seeds, making plans, and browsing the home improvement stores as the days lengthen and spring gets closer every day.  What are you planning for your garden or yard?  Holding back during mud season can be difficult since we just want to get out there and start the dirty work!  Solution: Register today for Fort Ticonderoga’s Third Annual Garden & Landscape Symposium “New Garden Visions” on Saturday, April 12. This day-long symposium, geared for both beginning and experienced gardeners, provides helpful insights from garden experts who live and garden in New York’s Adirondacks and northern New England.

I am excited about our line-up of speakers, and for the first time, a presentation is offered on vegetable gardening.  Even if you don’t have a dedicated plot for vegetables, it’s easy to tuck a few edibles in your flower beds or in containers. (I like to put a cherry tomato at the end of a flower bed near the back door for quick nibbles.)  Also new this year, we’ve added a panel discussion with our speakers who hail from Maine, Vermont and New York.  Bring your questions, ideas, and garden dilemmas to share with our panel and your fellow gardeners.

Speakers include:

  • Kerry Mendez, “Seasonal Garden Care for Gorgeous, ‘Well behaved’ Gardens”
  • Dr. Leonard Perry, “Spring Flowering Bulbs”
  • Dave Rutkowski, “Chemical-Free Gardening: A Success Story”
  • Jane Sorensen, “Landscape Design for Pollinators”

Registration for the Garden & Landscape Symposium is now open. The cost for the day-long symposium, which includes a homemade lunch prepared by Libby’s Bakery Café, is $75 ($65 for members of the Friends of Fort Ticonderoga). This event takes place in the Deborah Clarke Mars Education Center and is open by pre-registration only.  Visit our website for a brochure with the complete schedule and registration at http://www.fortticonderoga.org/learn/learning/garden-symposium. A printed copy is available by calling 518-585-2821.

I hope to see you this April at the symposium!

Heidi teRiele Karkoski
Director of Horticulture

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New Scholarship to Be Presented at Fort Ticonderoga’s Annual War College of the Seven Years’ War

Christopher Tozzi, from Howard University, discusses “How French were the French? The Demographic and Cultural Diversity of French Forces in the French & Indian War” at Fort Ticonderoga’s Nineteenth Annual War College of the Seven Years’ War May 16-18, 2014. Registration is now open for this annual seminar focused on the French & Indian War in North America.

Christopher Tozzi, from Howard University, discusses “How French were the French? The Demographic and Cultural Diversity of French Forces in the French & Indian War” at Fort Ticonderoga’s Nineteenth Annual War College of the Seven Years’ War May 16-18, 2014. Registration is now open for this annual seminar focused on the French & Indian War in North America.

Registration is now open for Fort Ticonderoga’s Nineteenth Annual War College of the Seven Years’ War May 16-18, 2014. This annual seminar focuses on the French & Indian War in North America (1754-1763), bringing together a panel of distinguished historians from around the country. The War College takes place in the Deborah Clarke Mars Education Center and is open to the public; pre-registration is required.
“Begun in 1996, the War College of the Seven Years’ War has become one of the premier seminars on the French & Indian War in the country. It features a mix of new and established scholars in an informal setting for a weekend of presentations related to the military, social, and cultural history of the French & Indian War,” said Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO.
2014 Speakers include:
• Daniel Baugh, Professor Emeritus at Cornell, “Why did the British Empire in North America Become Territorial in 1763?”
• Russell B. Bellico, author, and Joseph Zarzynski, author and underwater archaeologist, “What Amherst Left Behind: An Historical and Archaeological Analysis of Lake George’s ‘Sunken Bateaux of 1758.’”
• Alexander Campbell, author, “‘Not in the most regular manner’: The Royal American Regiment at Ticonderoga, 8 July 1758.”
• Phil Dunning, Parks Canada (retired), “Fill the Bowl Again!”
• John Maas, US Army Center of Military History, “North Carolina’s French & Indian War, 1754-1761.”
• David Miller, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, “‘Whatever our Fate may be’—Colonel Bouquet’s 1763 Expedition to Fort Pitt and the Battle of Bushy Run.”
• Christopher Tozzi, Howard University, “How French were the French? The Demographic and Cultural Diversity of French Forces in the French & Indian War.”
• Stephen Warfel, archaeologist, “Lost and Found: The Discovery of Fort Morris, Shippensburg, PA.”
The War College also features presentations by two Fort Ticonderoga staff. Curator of Collections Chris Fox will give a presentation “Founding Fashion: The Diversity of Regularity in 18th-Century Clothing Collections.” He will share knowledge garnered as curator of the Fort’s newest exhibition of the same name which opens on May 10, 2014, for a two-year run. Fort Ticonderoga’s Artificer Shoemaker Shaun Pekar will present on “Blue broad Cloth Lapll’d Coats of various Sizes, Kersey and Frize ditto” examining the dress of Massachusetts Provincial Soldiers during the 1758 campaign against Fort Carillon.
Registration for the War College is now open at $145 ($120 for those registering by March 15th); additional discounts available for members of the Friends of Fort Ticonderoga. Registration forms can be downloaded from the Fort’s website at www.fort-ticonderoga.org under the “Explore and Learn” tab by selecting “Life Long Learning” on the drop down menu and then clicking on the War College. A printed copy is also available upon request by contacting the Fort at 518-585-2821.

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