Living History Event: 1775 British Garrison at Ticonderoga

February 18, 2017

In this one-day living history event, see British garrison life in February of 1775, three months before Ticonderoga was waken into war once more. Discover soldiering in peacetime for the men of the 26th Foot and their wives and families who made their homes inside the crumbling walls of this fort. From blanket coats, to fur caps and mittens, discover the special clothing and equipment for service in Canada and along Lake Champlain. Witness the parts of British Army life that was the same across the globe from India to Detroit. Tour through the reconstructed Fort Ticonderoga of today and see what made this much vaunted fortification so vulnerable to be captured by the Green Mountain Boys.

Event tickets can be purchased upon arrival and are $10.00 per person; free admission is offered to Members of Fort Ticonderoga, Ambassador Pass Holders, and children age 4 and younger.
 
Visitor Schedule
 
10:00 AM Fort Ticonderoga Opens to Visitors
 
10:15 AM Key to the Continent Tour: A Captain’s Guard (Begins at the Large American Flag)
Between the battles of the French & Indian War and the beginning of the American Revolution, there was a peacetime in Ticonderoga. From destruction to construction and disrepair, discover how French Fort Carillon became Fort Ticonderoga. Plot the political developments that turned Fort Ticonderoga from a protector of New Englanders into their target.
 
11:00 AM Musket Demonstration (Fort Demonstration Area)
How did the British Army change its drill and training after the French & Indian War? 
Meet a soldier of the 26th Foot in 1775 and his musket and bayonet. Go beyond loading and firing to discuss what traditions remained and what tactical innovations were standard on the eve of the Revolutionary War.
 
11:30 AM “Those marked O are Old” Men of the 26th Foot at Ticonderoga (Mars Education Center Great Room)
Join Senior Director of Interpretation, Stuart Lilie, to chronical the 26th Foot’s service in America and how this regiment formed a guard for Ticonderoga. Explore the atrophy of peacetime service and efforts of prepare Ticonderoga for war again in 1775.
 
1:15 PM State of the Forts Tour (Begins at the Large American Flag)
Join Assistant Director of Interpretation, Nicholas Spadone, to witness the growth and reduction of the Fortifications of Ticonderoga. Discover the decay that appalled British engineers and vexed the garrison trying to maintain the walls and ramparts. 
 
2:00 PM Musket Demonstration (Fort Demonstration Area)
How did the British Army change its drill and training after the French & Indian War? Meet a soldier of the 26th Foot in 1775 and his musket and bayonet. Go beyond loading and firing to discuss what traditions remained and what tactical innovations were standard on the eve of the Revolutionary War.
 
2:30 PM Between the Wars: The Garrisons of Ticonderoga 1759-1775 (Mars Education Center Great Room)
Following its capture from the French in 1759, Fort Ticonderoga transitioned to a garrison, rather than being at the front lines of combat. British policy following the peace of 1763 called for the rotation of troops through American posts producing a steady stream of soldiers at the old French fort above Lake Champlain. Join Curator Matthew Keagle to trace the experiences of the 15 different regiments that held Ticonderoga for Britain.
 
3:00 PM Key to the Continent Tour: A Captain’s Guard (Begins at the Large American Flag)
Between the battles of the French & Indian War and the beginning of the American Revolution there was peacetime Ticonderoga. From destruction to construction and disrepair, discover how French Fort Carillon became Fort Ticonderoga. Plot the political developments that turned Fort Ticonderoga from a protector of New Englanders into their target.
 
4:00 PM Site closes to visitors
Daily Life Programs 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM 
 
Barracks or Apartments? (Ground Floor Soldiers and West Barracks)
Ticonderoga’s barrack space was built to house 400 soldiers.  In March of 1775 it was occupied by merely eighteen soldiers and a similar number of women and children. View the barracks divided up into apartment spaces, and work to keep each room clean and orderly.
 
A Soldier’s Duty (Ground Floor Soldier’s Barracks)
Each soldier was personally responsible for taking care of his clothing, arms, and accoutrements. Discuss with soldiers the daily maintenance of gear, and the different materials used in cleaning such as oils, blackball, and pipe clay.
 
A Followers Duty (First & Second Floors West Barracks)
Meet some of the women and children who stayed with their families at Ticonderoga in 1775. Discover how home crafts and trades kept them employed making, mending, cleaning, and serving the British army in war and peace.
 
Officer’s Quarters (Second Floor of the West Barracks)
Step inside the quarters of Captains William Delaplace, Ticonderoga’s Commandant, and learn of the luxuries within. From beds to brandy, learn about officers’ duties and comforts. See how an officer and gentleman was also a businessman.
 
“Of Messing and the Advantages attending it” (Ground Floor of the West Barracks)
Every barracks room had a hearth. See how the massive stone fireplaces of an old stone Fort were used to make meals of rations. What could a British soldier and his family expect for rations from the Army? How was this part of the care of an army flung across the far corners of an empire?  
 
Exhibitions
 
Pork, Pigeon, & Pottery (Ground Floor of the Soldiers’ Barracks)
It Would Make a Heart of Stone Melt (Ground Floor of the Soldiers’ Barracks)
Iron and Stone (Ground Floor of the Soldiers’ Barracks)
The Last Argument of Kings (Mars Education Center)