Found in Collections

In its one-hundred-plus year history as a museum and collecting institution, Fort Ticonderoga has been gifted, purchased, and has excavated a staggering number of internationally significant objects.  However, as many collections and curatorial departments know (from large city museums to small historical societies), the history of object collecting is rarely neat and tidy.  Exhibit cases, collections storage, and even closets, have historically hosted objects that carry no documentation.  And yet, these important pieces of material culture were at one time acquired with a purpose.  With a generous grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Sciences (# MA-30-16-0178-16), a team of four catalogers, project registrar, and project manager have been steadily working since November to clean, catalog, research, and re-house a group of objects, many with little to no documentation and have long resided in an unsuitable storage environment.

For this blog entry, the Collections Department is excited to share some of our discoveries and cataloging projects:

Cataloger, Amanda, photographs a shovel from the tool collection.

Tool Collection

Among the impressive archaeological finds uncovered at Fort Ticonderoga, is the largest assemblage of 18th-century tools in North America.  These tools aided in the building of structures and earthwork by three nations, French, British and American, and were found during the early 20th-century restoration of the fort.  A list titled ‘Relics from the Past Found at Fort Ticonderoga’ in the Summer 1949 Bulletin of the Fort Ticonderoga Museum includes, “Sledge hammers by the dozen” and “Spades and shovels of 8 to 10 different designs.”  We have cataloged over 1,300 tools through this project so far! Tool examples include shovels, axes, mattocks, picks, augers, fascine knives, Irish spades or loys, as well as masonry, wood working, and agricultural tools. We have found maker’s marks and even remnant pieces of wooden handles. The Collections Department is partnering with the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum to conduct a conservation assessment of this important collection, with plans for future conservation and exhibition.

 

“Thousands and thousands of grapeshot!” Persis diligently studies and measures the individual pieces of grapeshot.

Ammunition

On a landscape that saw extensive employment of Artillery, Fort Ticonderoga has an equally astonishing collection of ammunition.  As an example, the same ‘Relics’ listing from the Summer 1949 Bulletin notes “Thousands and thousands of grapeshot and little bullets from buckshot up.”  While the ammunition collection had been previously separated into groupings (cannon balls, mortar fragments, musket balls), their individual weights, calibers, and potential provenance had not been identified.  A dedicated cataloger has spent three months individually measuring each piece of ammunition with some exciting results: over 8,000 musket balls have been cataloged and re-housed. Unique examples range from ram rod impressions on musket balls to indentations indicating canister shots. Cannon balls have been separated with weights going from 1 pound up to 32 pounds, the latter the largest cannon known to have been used on site.  And thousands and thousands of grapeshot, weighing from 1 ½ ounces to a pound, have the most casting marks and flaws of all the types of ammunition.

 

Tabitha holds the lock plate with the intact bolt.

Archaeological Objects

Ammunition is not the only artifact collection to be found archaeologically at Fort Ticonderoga during its early 20th-century reconstruction.  An immense array of domestic, military, and naval objects, including copper kettles, tin canteens, and bayonets were excavated from the ruins and surrounding landscape.  While many of these undocumented historical pieces are easily identifiable, some are not.  Among the bulk of iron objects and fragments, a cataloger continued to find thin rectangular pieces, anywhere from 3 to 5 inches in length, with a large squared end and teethed protrusions along the opposite side. While cleaning and photographing locks, the cataloger turned over the plate to find the rectangular object in question still attached to its original housing.  As the doors of the fort succumbed to time and ruin, the iron locks suffered their own decay and while some retained the thin, rectangular bolt, others did not.  A number of these individual bolts have now been cataloged, and while their matching plate may never be found, their identification spurs further research.

Julia uses the HEPA filter collections vacuum and a screen to clean the 1746 petticoat.

Textiles

While cataloging continues on archaeological objects, team members have also been busy removing textiles from the old unsuitable storage environment. These textiles have been put through an important routine of freezing to kill any possible insects. The textiles are gently cleaned with a HEPA filter collections vacuum before being cataloged and placed in acid-free storage boxes.  In some instances, custom blueboard boxes have been made.  An exciting artifact, a yellow silk petticoat dated 1746, with a red linsey-woolsey interior and an embroidered English Coat of Arms now resides in its own custom box to prevent unnecessary folds in the fabric.  Among the textiles, have been invaluable new additions to the institution’s history.  A pair of turn of the 20th century J & J Slater heeled silk shoes with glass bead decoration on the toe caps, owned by Sarah G. T. Pell, co-founder of the Fort Ticonderoga Museum, have been cataloged and will be part of an exhibit on Sarah’s life and involvement in the Equal Rights Movement opening May 6th.

As the Collections Department continues to rediscover and catalog our collections, we look forward to sharing our exciting finds!

This project was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services grant # MA-30-16-0178-16.

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Fort Ticonderoga Brings Education onto Lake Champlain

Fort Ticonderoga recently received a grant from the South Lake Champlain Fund of the Vermont Community Foundation to support regional youth maritime educational programs. Aboard the 60-foot touring M/V, Carillon, each 90-minute narrated boat tour focuses on the historical importance of the Lake Champlain waterway through centuries of history, and highlights elements of geography, natural history, and lake stewardship. This experience enables students to better grasp the strategic importance of the Champlain-Hudson corridor in the 18th century and its role in the founding of America.

“Fort Ticonderoga is very grateful to the South Lake Champlain Fund for their support for our maritime educational programs,” said Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO. “We are committed to programs that engage young people in new and exciting ways. The exploration of our rich regional history and its role in our national story gives tremendous perspective and inspires us all to continue our ecological stewardship of the Lake Champlain region.”

Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 25,000 students per year through expeditionary learning, outreach programs, and onsite educational activities. Grant support from the South Lake Champlain Fund of the Vermont Community helps make possible an expanded all-inclusive experience for students at a discounted rate. Schools in New York and Vermont are eligible to apply, for more information, visit www.fortticonderoga.org or call the Group Tour Coordinator at (518) 585-1023.

The M/V, Carillon, is a 60-foot boat that offers daily tours around the Ticonderoga Peninsula. Fort Ticonderoga acquired the M/V, Carillon, in 2015 thanks to generous donor support. Funding was also received in 2015 through the New York State Regional Economic Development grant awards to support the first phase of development in a waterway transportation and recreation system including the recent installation of a dock. Visit www.fortticonderoga.org to learn more about boat tours, charters, and sunset cruises.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo: Photo Credit: Fort Ticonderoga. Fort Ticonderoga recently received a grant from the South Lake Champlain Fund of the Vermont Community Foundation to support regional youth maritime educational programs.

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2017 Graduate Fellowships Fort Ticonderoga Awards

Four graduate students from across the United States have been awarded the 2017 Edward W. Pell Graduate Fellowships at Fort Ticonderoga. This program runs from June 12-August 18 and will provide the students with practical, hands-on experience, working with the staff on cutting-edge programs and research.

“These Fellowships for graduate students offer an opportunity to work side by side with our dedicated museum staff,” noted Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO, Beth Hill. “These Fellows will focus their research and creative energy to support exhibitions, collections, and programs related to upcoming projects at Fort Ticonderoga.”

“While working individually with their project supervisors,” added Rich Strum, Director of Education, “The Fellows will also meet and work together throughout the two-month experience. They will have an opportunity to work with the museum’s professional staff as part of our team-approach to all major projects.”

This year’s Fellows will help lay the ground work for exhibitions, programs, and educational initiatives to be offered to the public in 2018.

This year’s Fellows are:

Theresa Ball, a graduate student in Museology and Library/Information Science at the University of Washington. Originally from Maine, Teri received her undergraduate degree at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and plans to pursue a career in curation and exhibit design with archives, special collections, and historic sites.

Anna Faherty, pursuing a dual degree at Simmons College in Archives and History. Her academic interests include American and European history of the mid- to late nineteenth century, labor history, and immigration history.

Elizabeth Beaudoin Gouin recently graduated with her master’s in art history from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. A native of New Hampshire, she has worked at the Norman Rockwell Museum, the Londonderry (Vermont) Arts and Historical Society, and the Enfield Shaker Museum.

Kathryn Kaslow is working on her master’s in Public History at the University of South Carolina. She earned her undergraduate degree at Messiah College and plans to work in interpretation and education at museums or historic sites.

The Edward W. Pell Graduate Fellowship program was launched in 2015. Eight previous fellows came from Connecticut College, New York University, North Carolina State University, Stony Brook University, Texas State University (two students), the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and Western Michigan University.

The Edward W. Pell Graduate Fellowships at Fort Ticonderoga are made possible with the support from the Edward W. Pell Education Endowment at Fort Ticonderoga, the Mars Education Center Endowment, and several generous individual donors.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo: Photo Credit: Fort Ticonderoga. This year’s Fellows will help lay the ground work for exhibitions, programs, and educational initiatives to be offered to the public in 2018.

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French Artillery Reforms Focus of Fort Fever Series Program April 9th

Fort Ticonderoga’s “Fort Fever Series” concludes on Sunday, April 9th, at 2:00 p.m. with “Gribeauval’s Guns: French Artillery Reforms from Montcalm to Napoleon” presented by Curator Matthew Keagle. The cost is $10 per person and can be purchased at the gate; Fort Ticonderoga Members and Ambassador Pass Holders are admitted free of cost. The program will take place in the Mars Education Center.

This Fort Fever presentation will take participants on a tour using the rare examples in Fort Ticonderoga’s collections of reforms of the French artillery in the wake of the French and Indian War, one of the most important technological and tactical developments in artillery during the 18th century.

“Fort Ticonderoga’s world class collection of artillery stretches beyond the story of Ticonderoga alone, connecting us to important historical events and movements across the world,” said Matthew Keagle, Curator at Fort Ticonderoga. “French cannon in particular, illustrate the immense technological and political shifts occurring in France after Fort Ticonderoga, later named Carillon, had fallen to the English.”

Matthew Keagle is the Curator of the Fort Ticonderoga Museum and holds degrees from Cornell University, the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture, and the Bard Graduate Center. He has researched and spoken widely on topics related to the material culture of the military in the long 18th century in the US, Canada, and Europe.

Additional programs taking place at Fort Ticonderoga early this spring include a Clothing and Accoutrement Workshop offered April 8 & 9. Fort Ticonderoga presents the Sixth Annual Garden & Landscape Symposium on April 8th (pre-registration required). You can learn more about all of these programs by visiting www.fortticonderoga.org.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo:Gribeauval’s Guns: French Artillery Reforms from Montcalm to Napoleon “will be the topic of the next Fort Fever Series program on Sunday, April 9, 2017, at 2:00 P.M. given by Curator of Fort Ticonderoga, Matthew Keagle. Admission is $10; free for Members of Fort Ticonderoga and Ambassador Pass Holders.

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North Country History Day is More than “a Day”

By Director of Education, Rich Strum.

Earlier this month, 59 students from across northern New York participated in North Country History Day held here at Fort Ticonderoga. Students placing first and second in their categories will advance to represent the region at New York State History Day in Cooperstown on April 24th.

Students were engaged and passionate about their projects—and passionate about history. I spoke with students who simply bubbled over with enthusiasm as they discussed their projects and the history behind them. This year’s theme was “Taking a Stand in History” and a brief sampling of topics chosen by students included: “The Twentieth Maine and the Stand that Saved the Union,” “Rosa Parks,” and “Taking a Stand for Women’s Suffrage: Lucy Burns, Alice Paul, and Carrie Chapman Catt.”

Thirty-three of these students will advance to represent the North Country at New York State History Day. These students have the opportunity to review the comments from the judges and make changes to their projects before the state contest.

Engaging students and creating a life-long love of learning is the goal of school programs here at Ticonderoga! We are expecting thousands of students to visit Fort Ticonderoga this spring. We have several school groups participating in our “Artificer’s Apprentice” program this March and April and thousands more are coming in May and June. They will be able to watch as soldiers prepare their noon meal, visit the Historic Trades Shop to see the making of clothing and shoes, and explore the exhibits in the Museum.

Many students will take part in the “To Act as One United Body” program while at Fort Ticonderoga. In this immersive program, students form a platoon and learn about the training of soldiers at Ticonderoga in the weeks following the outbreak of the American Revolution in the spring and early summer of 1775. Students learn teamwork skills as they experience aspects of the lives of soldiers.

For some schools, their spring visit to Ticonderoga comes after a visit to their school by a member of our outreach team. Our staff has visited over 30 schools on both sides of Lake Champlain this winter and spring, bringing reproduction clothing and objects to help illustrate the lives of the soldiers who journeyed to Ticonderoga in the late spring of 1775. These programs have helped illuminate the story of Ticonderoga while at the same time using language arts, geography, and math skills to help students grasp the enormity of the task of feeding and supplying an army in the northern wilderness.

We encourage a passion for history in not just young people, but all our visitors. Our staff is passionate, our visitors are passionate, and I hope you are passionate about Ticonderoga, the stories it has to tell, and all it can teach us about not just history, but life.

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Witness the French Military Campaign to Capture Lake George on 260th Anniversary

Join Fort Ticonderoga for a one-day living history event Saturday, March 25th to witness how French soldiers, Canadians, and Native warriors prepare for an attack on Fort William Henry on March 16, 1757. From wool leggings and moccasins to snowshoes and toboggans, explore traditional tools and supplies that were vital to winter survival on the frontier of New France. Discover France’s military situation and their strategy against the British as they entered 1757 with outnumbered troops and isolated by a blockade. How could they possibly overcome such odds?

“This living history event will highlight the story of the people who provided the groundwork and material to take Fort William Henry during a vicious winter attack in 1757,” said Beth Hill, President and CEO of Fort Ticonderoga. “Our commitment to bring the dramatic and real story of our past to life through unforgettable programs, such as this event, is an opportunity to share with our visitors the importance of this place in the Atlantic world in the 18th century.”

Highlighted programs including tours, living history demonstrations, historic trades, weapons demonstrations, and fife and drum corps performances throughout the day transform Ticonderoga into the year 1757 and bring this dramatic story to life when the British and French Empires were vying over this strategic region in North America.

Weapons demonstrations go beyond loading and firing to explore how weapons designed for European warfare served in winter raids in America. Tour through the Fort Ticonderoga of today and see what materials were used to construct strong fortified walls. Join museum staff for a presentation that examines the rich story of regiments of French soldiers who built and defended Carillon, later named Ticonderoga. Listen to the stirring tunes that directed the soldiers’ day and eased long bitter winter campaigns during Fife and Drum Corps performances.

Admission to the event is $10 for the general public and free to Fort Ticonderoga Members, Ambassador Pass holders, and children age four and under. For the full event schedule, visit http://www.fortticonderoga.org/events/fort-events/four-divisions-formed-at-fort-carillon-rigaud-s-attack-of-fort-william-henry/detail.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo: Credit: Fort Ticonderoga. The Four Divisions Formed at Fort Carillon Living History Event will take place on March 25th at Fort Ticonderoga.

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Students from the North Country District Advance to New York State History Day

Twenty-five middle and high school students from New York’s North Country District won top prizes at the North Country History Day that took place on Saturday, March 4th at Fort Ticonderoga. The event was held in the Mars Education Center. These students will advance to compete at the New York State History Day in Cooperstown on April 24th.

“It is so rewarding to see students so passionate about history,” said Rich Strum, Fort Ticonderoga’s Director of Education and North Country’s Regional Coordinator for New York State History Day. “History Day provides students with an opportunity to delve into a topic which interests them while also relating to an annual theme. This year’s theme is ‘Taking a Stand in History.’ Students explored a number of historic events, eras, and people that reflected that theme.”

National History Day is the nation’s leading program for history education in schools. The program annually engages 2 million people in 48 states, the District of Columbia, and Guam.

Teachers and students from Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton, St. Lawrence, and Warren counties interested in participating in North Country History Day during the 2017-18 school year should contact Rich Strum at rstrum@fort-ticonderoga.org or at (518) 585-6370. Next year’s timeline is “Conflict and Compromise in History.”

Junior Division (Grades 6-8) North Country Regional winners include:

  • Leylanis Perez, from Gouverneur Central School, placed first in the Historical Paper category with her paper “The Civil War: From Preserving the Union to Abolition.”
  • Aiden Breckenridge, Cole Siebels, and Christopher Weaver, from Gouverneur Central School, placed first in the Group Documentary category with their documentary “The Twentieth Maine and the Stand that Saved the Union.”
  • Kolby Wells and Lauren McCarthy, from Gouverneur Central School, placed first in the Group Performance category with their performance “Malala Yousafzai: Standing Up for Girls’ Education around the Globe.”
  • Jaelyn Stevens, Sean Farrand, and Felicia Tallon, from Gouverneur Central School, placed second in the Group Performance category with their performance “Stand Up for Civil Rights Talk Show.”
  • Kathryn Moran, from St. Mary’s School in Ticonderoga, placed first in the Individual Exhibit category with her exhibit “Rosa Parks.”
  • Riley Seaman, from Gouverneur Central School, placed second in the Individual Exhibit category with her exhibit “Queen Elizabeth I Takes a Stand for England.”
  • Janay Smith and Grace Mashaw, from Gouverneur Central School, placed first in the Group Exhibit category with their exhibit “The Civil War and Abraham Lincoln’s Stand Against Slavery.”
  • Randi Griffith, Elizabeth Riutta, and Drew Jenkins, from Gouverneur Central School, placed second in the Group Exhibit category with their exhibit “Hippocrates Takes a Stand.”
  • Alex Clancy, from Gouverneur Central School, placed first in the Individual Website category with his website “Susan B. Anthony: Taking a Stand for Women’s Rights.”
  • Skylar Barber, from St. Mary’s School in Ticonderoga, placed second in the Individual Website category with her website “Protecting the Environment: The Establishment of the National Park Service.”
  • Clayton Wilhelm and Jackson Wilhelm, homeschool students from Glens Falls, New York, placed first in the Group Website category with their website “How Men Stood Up for Women.”

Senior Division (Grades 9-12) North Country Regional winners include:

  • Jacob Andre, from Peru Central School, placed first in the Historical Paper category with his paper “John Brown and the Fight for Freedom: The Events that Sparked a Country’s Divide.”
  • Ray Bryant, from Moriah Central School, placed first in the Individual Documentary category with his documentary “The Burden of a Generation.”
  • Grace Sayward, Liam Sayward, Trent Yourdon, and Ben Caito, homeschool students from Essex and Clinton counties, placed first in the Group Documentary category with their documentary “Fanny Hall.”
  • Nicholad Manfred, Sophie Bryant, and Samantha Staples, from Moriah Central School, placed first in the Group Exhibit category for their exhibit “The Awakening of Omniscience: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s Stance Against the Gulag.”
  • Mackenzie Peters, Jonathan Gibbs, Sarah Anderson, and Dyani Bryant, from Moriah Central School, placed second in the Group Exhibit category for their exhibit “Malala, the Girl Who did the Unthinkable.”

A special prize for the best use of primary sources, sponsored by the New York State Archives and the New York State Archives Partnership, was awarded to Grace Sayward, Liam Sayward, Trent Yourdon, and Ben Caito, from North Country Homeschoolers, for their documentary “Fanny Hall.” A special prize for the Junior Division entry that best addressed the theme of “Taking a Stand in History, sponsored by the Adirondack Torch Club, was awarded to Randi Griffith, Elizabeth Riutta, and Drew Jenkins, from Gouverneur Central School, for their exhibit “Hippocrates Takes a Stand.”

Participating schools included Gouverneur Central School, Moriah Central School, Peru Central School, and St. Mary’s School (Ticonderoga) as well as home school students from North Country Homeschooling in Clinton County and Edison Academy Homeschool in Warren County.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo: Credit: Fort Ticonderoga. Grace Mashaw and Janay Smith, from Gouverneur Central School, placed first in the Group Exhibit category with their exhibit “The Civil War and Abraham Lincoln’s Stand Against Slavery” during the 2017 North Country History Day at Fort Ticonderoga.

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Fort Ticonderoga Offers Scholarships for Annual War College of the Seven Years’ War

Fort Ticonderoga offers four middle or high school teachers the opportunity to attend the Twenty-Second Annual War College of the Seven Years’ War May 19-21, 2017, on scholarships. With a panel of distinguished historians from across the United States, this seminar focuses on the Seven Years’ War in North America, also known as the French & Indian War. The War College takes place in the Mars Education Center and is open to the public; pre-registration is required. The scholarships are available for educators who are first-time attendees at the War College

Begun in 1996, the War College of the Seven Years’ War has become the premier seminar on the French & Indian War in the United States. It features a mix of new and established scholars in an informal setting for a weekend of presentations related to the military, social, and cultural history of the French & Indian War.

Since 2001, Fort Ticonderoga has provided scholarships for 68 teachers from across the United States to attend the War College, and a total of 130 teacher scholarships to attend seminars and conferences at Ticonderoga.

Teachers interested in applying for a scholarship to attend this year’s War College can download an application at www.fortticonderoga.org by clicking on “Education” and selecting “Educators” on the drop down menu. Applications are due by March 15th. Successful applicants will receive free registration, two box lunches, and an opportunity to dine with the War College speakers at a private dinner on the Saturday of the War College. Contact Rich Strum, Director of Education, at rstrum@fort-ticonderoga.org if you have questions.

Non-teachers can register to attend the War College as well. The cost is $130 if registering before March 15th; $155 after that date. There are discounts for Members of Fort Ticonderoga. Registration forms can be downloaded from the Fort’s website at www.fortticonderoga.org by clicking on “Education” and selecting “Workshops and Seminars” on the drop down menu. Printed copies are available by calling (518) 585-2821.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo:  Fort Ticonderoga presents the Twenty-Second Annual War College of the Seven Years’ War May 19-21, 2017. Registration is now open for this annual seminar focused on the French & Indian War in North America. Early Bird Registration—with a savings of $25—closes March 15th.

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French Architecture at Carillon focus of Fort Fever Series Program March 12th

Fort Ticonderoga’s “Fort Fever Series” continues on Sunday, March 12th, at 2:00 p.m. with “Basse Ville: Vernacular Architecture of the Lower Town at Carillon,” presented by Assistant Director of Interpretation, Nicholas Spadone. The cost is $10 per person and can be purchased at the gate; Fort Ticonderoga Members and Ambassador Pass Holders are admitted free of cost. The program will take place in the Mars Education Center.

This Fort Fever presentation will examine the vernacular architecture of Ticonderoga’s temporary structures and shed light on how the peninsula appeared from 1755-1759.

“Today, the impressive stone fort protrudes on the peninsula prinently,” said Nicholas Spadone, Assistant Director of Interpretation. “Much less known are dozens of temporary structures that dotted the landscape during the French occupation at Carillon, later named Ticonderoga. What remains of those structures are simply stone foundations or merely a drawing on a map. However, new research has revealed the structure’s rich story.”

The “Fort Fever Series” is just one of several programs taking place at Fort Ticonderoga this winter and early spring. Clothing and Accoutrements Workshops are offered March 11 & 12 and April 8 & 9. Fort Ticonderoga presents the living history event “Four Divisions formed at Fort Carillon: Rigaud’s Attack of Fort William Henry” on March 25th. The Sixth Annual Garden & Landscape Symposium will be held on April 8th. You can learn more about all of these programs by visiting www.fortticonderoga.org. Some programs require advanced registration.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo:  French vernacular architecture at Carillon will be the topic of the next Fort Fever Series program on Sunday, March 12, 2017, at 2:00 P.M. presented by Assistant Director of Interpretation, Nicholas Spadone. Admission is $10; free for Members of Fort Ticonderoga and Ambassador Pass Holders.

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Area Students to Compete at North Country History Day

A student from St. Mary’s School talks with judges about her project at last year’s North Country History Day. On March 4th, 60 students will compete at Fort Ticonderoga, representing the region at New York State History Day in Cooperstown in late April.

Sixty students from across the North Country will compete in the regional New York State History Day contest held in the Mars Education Center at Fort Ticonderoga on Saturday, March 4th. Students placing first and second in their categories will advance to the New York State History Day Contest in Cooperstown on April 24th. This year, our presenters are from Clinton, Essex, St. Lawrence, and Warren counties.

Participants research history topics of their choice related to an annual theme and create exhibits, documentaries, performances, research papers, and website designs to present to a panel of judges. This year’s theme is ‘Taking a Stand in History.’

Students may enter in competition at the regional, state, and national level. Participants include students in grades 6-8 in the Junior Division and grades 9-12 in the Senior Division. National History Day also provides educational services to students and teachers, including a summer internship program, curricular materials, internet resources, and annual teacher workshops and training institutes.

“Each year two million students from across the United States participate in the National History Day program,” noted Rich Strum, Fort Ticonderoga’s Director of Education and North Country History Day Regional Coordinator. “Recent research shows that students who participate in the National History Day program consistently outperform their peers in state standardized tests, not only in social studies, but in science and math as well. Students learn valuable research and critical-thinking skills essential to success in today’s business world.”

Members of the public are invited to view student projects from 1:00 pm-3:15 pm. Student-created performances run from 1:15 pm-2:15 pm, and exhibits are open from 2:15 pm-3:15 pm. The public can also attend the Awards Ceremony at 3:15 pm.

There is no charge to attend North Country History Day. Donor support makes possible this program and many others offered at Fort Ticonderoga throughout the year.

To learn more about North Country History Day and how students can participate, visit www.fortticonderoga.org and on the “Education” tab select “Students.”

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

 

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