Category: Living History & Material Culture

Fort Ticonderoga Names Matthew Keagle as Curator of Collections

Fort Ticonderoga has announced the appointment of Matthew Keagle to serve as Curator of Collections at Fort Ticonderoga, one of the oldest and most significant historic site and museum in North America. “Matthew begins his tenure as Curator with tremendous vision and enthusiasm for the future as we move forward with bold plans toward an […]

Fort Ticonderoga Launches New Graduate Fellowships

Fort Ticonderoga is launching the Edward W. Pell Graduate Fellowships for students seeking practical, hands-on internship experience at a historic site and museum with cutting-edge programs. The fellowships run from June 15 to August 15, 2015, and include internships in Collections, Exhibitions, Education, and Interpretation. “These fellowships for graduate students in museum studies, museum education, […]

Damnatio Memoriae

In Latin the phrase damnatio memoriae means “to condemn the memory.” It refers to the practice of erasing someone’s presence from history by removing images or references to them. Whether legally sanctioned or spontaneous, it was a powerful form of punishment. Damnatio memoriae could take many forms. In ancient Rome portraits and statues were often […]

“Lodging as the Nature of the Campaign will Admit”

The 4th Pennsylvania Battalion, along with the other regiments of their brigade, completed their fortifications along the Old French lines by early September in 1776. Officers and men had lived in tents since they encamped on this hill in July. With the works finished, Colonel Anthony Wayne issued the order to begin building better housing […]

“by Taylors of their respective Companies”

Many of the documents from 4th Pennsylvania Battalion Quartermaster John Harper reside in the collection of Fort Ticonderoga today. These papers document many aspects of the supply of this regiment, including its resupply with clothing and materials while encamped at Ticonderoga in 1776. These papers include receipts for large amounts of cloth for the regiment […]

“Too Opposite Characters”

Today in the United States broad regional differences are part of the national character, but in the early years of the Revolutionary War regional differences were far more acute. As thirteen unique colonies allied together for their mutual independence, soldiers from these colonies, and eventually states, were often like foreigners brought together in the same […]

Never Say Never

To historians, perhaps as much as scientists, proving yourself wrong is often more exciting than being correct.  Often visitors ask about how the cavalry was used in battle around Fort Ticonderoga, to which our answer would be that we haven’t found any evidence of cavalry at Fort Ticonderoga. Typically, we elaborate on this answer to […]