Category: Life Long Learning

Gaining Perspective from the Participants of the 1756 French Soldiers’ Row to Ticonderoga

During opening weekend on May 9 – 10 at Fort Ticonderoga, visitors stepped into New France in 1756 as French soldiers returned by bateaux from posts down Lake Champlain. This event kicked off the 2015 season at Fort Ticonderoga and captured the site’s epic story on land and water. The Living History event traced the […]

Regional Students win Awards at New York State History Day

Two projects by North Country students won special prizes at New York State History Day held in Cooperstown, New York, on Monday, April 27. Ben Caito and Liam Sayward, homeschool students from the Plattsburgh area won the Hanaford Mills Museum’s Power of Rural History Award and Mackenzie Strum from Ticonderoga High School won the American […]

Spring Ahead of Opening Season!

Yes, it’s true. Spring is finally here! The morning routine of layering up, strapping on our boots, and warming up our cars is officially a practice of the past. Although winter is making an attempt to linger here in the Adirondacks, it won’t be long before our quiet woods are greeted with the return of […]

Fort Ticonderoga Teacher Institute Seeks Applications

Fort Ticonderoga is now accepting applications from teachers to participate in the 2015 Fort Ticonderoga Teacher Institute June 28 – July 3, 2015. The focus of this year’s institute is “The French & Indian War: Ticonderoga at the Center of a Global Conflict” and will accommodate 12 teachers for a week-long exploration of the pivotal role that […]

As You Prepare for Fort Ticonderoga’s Battle On Snowshoes Re-enactment: What You May Not Have Known About Bobby and His Buddies…

1.  Rogers’ Rangers were a remarkably diverse group In spite of the French and Indian War’s moniker, not all Native Americans sided with the French. While the majority of them did, numerous tribes remained neutral, backed the British or shifted allegiances as the war progressed. Robert Rogers had tremendous admiration and respect for the New […]

Damnatio Memoriae

In Latin the phrase damnatio memoriae means “to condemn the memory.” It refers to the practice of erasing someone’s presence from history by removing images or references to them. Whether legally sanctioned or spontaneous, it was a powerful form of punishment. Damnatio memoriae could take many forms. In ancient Rome portraits and statues were often […]

Making History “Real”

Monday, September 16, 1776, breaks at Ticonderoga with a hint of the cold weather yet to come, and the fortifications at Ticonderoga and Mount Independence are draped in the “Thick Fogs, that are peculiar at this place.” Thus another day dawns for the Continental Army’s Northern Department on the shores of Lake Champlain. Dr. Lewis […]