• One Destination,
    Endless Adventures
    Your Adventure Awaits
    at Fort Ticonderoga

  • One Destination,
    Endless Adventures
    Your Adventure Awaits
    at Fort Ticonderoga

  • One Destination,
    Endless Adventures
    Your Adventure Awaits
    at Fort Ticonderoga

  • One Destination,
    Endless Adventures
    Your Adventure Awaits
    at Fort Ticonderoga

Fort Ticonderoga and Mount Defiance are open for Campaign Season and daily visitation Tuesday-Sunday through October 31, 2021! 

Explore the beautiful gardens, discover the epic history, find adventure in signature events, march with the Fifes & Drums, and learn about a historic trade.

Visit the reconstructed fort, get lost in the 6-acre historic corn maze, enjoy the Carillon Battlefield hiking trail, and take in the unforgettable view from the top of Mount Defiance with a sweeping vista of Lake Champlain and Vermont’s Green Mountains.

Stay up-to-date with on-site events and exciting virtual programs by visiting the event calendar.

Aerial of Fort Ticonderoga

Spend the Day, Discover the Beauty,
& Experience the History

Buy one day admission, visit the next day free!

Open Rain or Shine

See What's Happening at Ticonderoga All Upcoming Events

  • aerial view of fort ticonderoga. Photo credit Carl Heilman II

    August

    3

    Daily Programs & Outdoor Exploration

    Every day is an event at Fort Ticonderoga and every year is a new experience! This year, Fort Ticonderoga debuts a new chapter in its story. Discover innovative storytelling on a grand scale with guided tours, witness thrilling weapons demonstrations, explore endless outdoor activities, and see the British-occupied fort in the years just before the […]

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  • Carillon boat tour

    August

    3

    Carillon Boat Cruises

    Enjoy the sweeping vistas of Vermont’s Green Mountains and New York’s Adirondack Mountains during a 75-minute narrated boat tour aboard the Carillon. Let our friendly and experienced staff be your guide to Lake Champlain’s centuries of stirring maritime heritage with panoramic vistas around you and a sonar view of shipwrecks below. Embark on this unforgettable experience […]

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  • beneath fortress walls tour

    August

    4

    Specialty Tour: Beneath Fortress Walls

    Learn the history of the building and re-building of Fort Ticonderoga on a guided tour beneath the fort walls with Fort Ticonderoga Curator Dr. Matthew Keagle. Explore around, on top, and inside of the fort to find out all of the secrets including areas that are off-limits to the general public. Over 250 years ago, […]

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All Upcoming Events

Instagram @FORT_TICONDEROGA

#fortticonderoga #ticonderoga #americasfort

Rain or shine, join Fort Ticonderoga this weekend to experience the rousing sounds of the Fifes & Drums which hoisted the spirits of an American Army in 1776!

Through musical concerts, living history vignettes, and weapon demonstrations, discover the story of the Northern Continental Army, which rebuilt itself at Ticonderoga beginning in July 1776.

Click the link in our bio to purchase tickets! 
https://www.fortticonderoga.org/visit/buy-tickets/<https://www.fortticonderoga.org/visit/buy-tickets/?fbclid=IwAR2Mf7eaO6vX1LXTBJaR-L4UDi33DSgAU3Wk5xX3mYprtLeBz6yYYvzk_4o>
Any idea what this week's #WhatIsItWednesday object might be? The answer will be revealed tomorrow!
This week’s #WhatIsItWednesday object is a shoe buckle! Shoe buckles came into fashion in the mid 17th century and fell out of fashion by the end of the 18th century. Buckles could be made out of many different metals, ranging from the expensive silver to brass, copper, pewter and iron at the cheaper end. Because shoe buckles were purchased separate from the shoe itself, many people likely owned multiple pairs of buckles that they could swap out for special occasions, work, or fashion trends. This buckle was cast, or molded, which means a mold with all of the decoration was created and molten metal was poured in to create the final product. In 1778 a machine that could stamp buckles out, rather than molding them, was invented and quickly increased the speed that shoe buckles could be made. In Birmingham, England, which was the center of shoe buckle production, over 2.5 million pairs of shoe buckles were made every year in the 1780s! Shoe buckles would have been a very common sight here at Fort Ticonderoga, worn by soldiers and civilians, men and women alike. #TiconderogaCollections #fortticonderoga #ticonderoga #18thcentury #archaeology #archeology #artifact #fashion #shoe #buckle #history #museum #museumcollection
Any idea what this week's #WhatIsItWednesday detail might be? The answer will be revealed tomorrow!
This week’s #WhatIsItWednesday object is a French butcher knife, also known as a boucheron! The 1757 King’s Storehouses Inventory taken by French soldiers at Fort Ticonderoga (then known as Carillon) records “cinquante-cinq douzaines de couteaux boucheron,” or fifty-five dozen butcher knives. A butcher knife like this one would have been issued to French soldiers and used in all sorts of culinary contexts, such as cutting meat. This object was found during excavation work for the Mars Education Center, and was catalogued as part of the work done by the Edward W. Pell Graduate Fellows working at Fort Ticonderoga this summer. Fort Ticonderoga also has another similar knife with its original wooden handle.  #TiconderogaCollections #ewpfellows #fortticonderoga #ticonderoga #museum #museumcollection #archaeology #archeology #artifact #18thcentury #french #food #history #militaryhistory