• One Destination,
    Endless Adventures
    Your Adventure Awaits
    at Fort Ticonderoga

  • One Destination,
    Endless Adventures
    Your Adventure Awaits
    at Fort Ticonderoga

  • One Destination,
    Endless Adventures
    Your Adventure Awaits
    at Fort Ticonderoga

  • One Destination,
    Endless Adventures
    Your Adventure Awaits
    at Fort Ticonderoga

Winter Quarter's Campaign

Visit our events page to learn about our exciting winter events!

Aerial of Fort Ticonderoga

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& Experience the History

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  • Von German 24th Regiment Soldier

    April

    5

    Fitted with Great Exactness: The Life and Importance of Clothing to the British Soldier in the Era of the American Revolution

    Fort Ticonderoga’s popular winter/spring Sunday lecture program series concludes this Sunday, April 5 at 2:00 p.m. with a live stream via Facebook Live of “Fitted with Great Exactness: The Life and Importance of Clothing to the British Soldier in the Era of the American Revolution.” Fort Ticonderoga Artificer Tailor Joseph “Gibb” Zea explores the great […]

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  • British portrayal

    May

    2

    Daily Programs

    Exciting experiences every day! Fort Ticonderoga flawlessly blends history and natural beauty for all ages to enjoy. NEW! Discover the year 1774 during the peacetime garrison life in British North America on the eve of the Revolutionary War. Explore Ticonderoga’s many other chapters through new immersive programs, guided tours, weapons firing demonstrations, major exhibits, breathtakingly […]

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  • May

    9

    Battle Reenactment: No Quarter Two-Day Event

    Benedict Arnold is returning to Fort Ticonderoga through the dramatic two-day reenactment of “America’s First Victory. The “No Quarter” event vividly recreates the capture of Fort Ticonderoga on May 10, 1775, putting visitors in the middle of the country’s first military victory. The phrase “No Quarter” was the battle cry used by the Americans and […]

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All Upcoming Events

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You asked, and we listened! Check out the link in You asked, and we listened! Check out the link in bio for Curator Matt’s answers to several of your questions this week. 
Do you have other burning questions about Fort Ticonderoga, it’s history, or the collections? Ask them below and they may be selected for next time!

#AskDrMatt #TiconderogaCollections #WFH #StrategicDistancing #fortticonderoga #collection #history #qanda
This week’s #WhatIsItWednesday object is a breas This week’s #WhatIsItWednesday object is a breastplate! From ancient times to the era of Samuel de Champlain, armor like this was used to protect the wearer’s torso in combat. However, it had become increasingly obsolete by the 18th century, and became largely decorative and symbolic. This breastplate is decorated with a floral border, with the keel featuring images of two knights on horseback and a winged figure holding a bow, possibly a depiction of Cupid. Go to our link in bio to learn more about this awesome object! #TiconderogaCollections #fortticonderoga #ticonderoga #collections #armor #spring #flowers #cupid #militaryhistory
The finishing touches are going onto another Briti The finishing touches are going onto another British 26th Regiment of Foot drummer's coat! If you want to learn about the clothing worn by American soldiers, check out our online A Soldiers Life program. Each Thursday, this engaging program focuses on clothing! Learn more about Fort Ticonderoga’s Center for Digital History through the link in bio! #HistoricTrades #DigitalHistory #FortifyYourself #fortticonderoga #ticonderoga #history #education #learning #kids #children #educators
Any idea what this week's #WhatIsItWednesday objec Any idea what this week's #WhatIsItWednesday object might be? The answer will be revealed tomorrow!
Infectious disease plagued the armies of the 18th Infectious disease plagued the armies of the 18th century. The decision to fortify Ticonderoga in the summer of 1776 was in part a response not to the British, but an even more insidious viral enemy. Through extreme strategic distancing, the Continental Army was able to overcome one of its biggest enemies, in time to face the British...
Check out Fort Ticonderoga’s newest blog post through the link in bio! #fortticonderoga #ticonderoga #18thcentury #militaryhistory #sickness #health #stayhealthy
When he was a young man George Washington copied d When he was a young man George Washington copied down a series of "Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior." While many of these rules are still good guides for behaving politely, one in particularly struck us as particularly useful to remember in the current environment: "bedew no mans face with your Spittle." So take a tip from George, keep yourself and your neighbors healthy, remember to keep your distance, and when you do interact with people, say it, don't spray it! #fortticonderoga #ticonderogacollections #georgewashington #18thcentury #stayhealthy
Earlier this week we asked our Facebook followers Earlier this week we asked our Facebook followers for questions to be answered by Fort Ticonderoga’s Curator Matthew Keagle. Click on the #AskDrKeagle image in our link in bio to see this week’s answers!

Do you have other burning questions about Fort Ticonderoga, it’s history, or the collections? Ask them below and they may be selected for next time!

Not a fan of Fort Ticonderoga on Facebook? Like our page for more content and updates!

#AskDrKeagle #fortticonderoga #TiconderogaCollections #history #militaryhistory #ticonderoga #questions #qanda
#FromtheVault Perhaps the most impressive survivor #FromtheVault Perhaps the most impressive survivor of Henry Knox’s “Noble Train of Artillery” is the fragment of a French 12-pouce mortar. Knox’s expedition was just one part of its fascinating history... Check out the fascinating story in our blog article through the link in our bio! #fortticonderoga #ticonderoga #militaryhistory #artillery
This week’s #WhatIsItWednesday object is a smoki This week’s #WhatIsItWednesday object is a smoking pipe fragment! This pipe bowl, dating to around 1755-1775, was uncovered during archaeological work around the East Barracks in the year 2000, prior to the construction of Fort Ticonderoga’s Mars Education Center. Multiple pipe fragments, as well as other archaeological artifacts, were found on site during the excavations, many of which can be found on our online database. Check out the link in bio to see this object on the Ticonderoga Online Collections database! #TiconderogaCollections #fortticonderoga #archaeology #militaryhistory #18thcentury #allartifactsmatter
Any idea what this week's #WhatIsItWednesday objec Any idea what this week's #WhatIsItWednesday object is? The answer will be revealed tomorrow!
#DidYouKnow Peonies feature prominently in the 192 #DidYouKnow Peonies feature prominently in the 1921 Marian Cruger Coffin plan for the Ticonderoga King's Garden. While no variety is noted, the most popular variety at the time and even today are the pink 'Sarah Bernhardt' Peony. Sarah was a famous star of the stage in the late 19th & early 20th century. Like many great artists of her time, she did her own patriotic service in the Great War. #ColorfulHistory
This week’s #WhatIsItWednesday object is a gorge This week’s #WhatIsItWednesday object is a gorget! With origins stemming from medieval armor, by the 18th century gorgets like this were worn by officers in the British military as an ornamental mark of authority. The center of this gilded brass piece is engraved with the British royal coat of arms, along with the letters “GR” above, indicating "Georgius Rex," Latin for "King George," in this case probably George III." A number of the museum’s gorgets can be found among the 3000+ objects on our searchable online database! #TiconderogaCollections #fortticonderoga #18thcentury #history #armor #militaryhistory #medieval
Another #WhatIsItWednesday is here! Any idea what Another #WhatIsItWednesday is here! Any idea what this object might be? The answer will be revealed tomorrow!
Did you know that there are over 3,000 museum obje Did you know that there are over 3,000 museum objects on Ticonderoga’s Online Collections database? It’s true! And #TEAMconderoga will continue to add content (remotely)💻 throughout the month. Link in bio 👆#museums #history #WFH #education #18thcentury @fort_ticonderoga
This week’s #WhatIsItWednesday object is a green This week’s #WhatIsItWednesday object is a green painted leather infantry cap from around 1840! The MR on the cap plate and the green color suggest this cap belonging to a company called the Montgomery Rifles, a volunteer militia unit composed mostly of Irish descendants and a reference to Richard Montgomery, an Irishman who became the first American general killed in the Revolution. See this cap, and learn more about the life and legacy of Richard Montgomery in a special pop-up exhibit for this weekend’s Living History Event, "Proceed to Canada with all  Possible Expedition"! #TiconderogaCollections #fortticonderoga #militaryhistory #militia #cap #hats #fashion #19thcentury #history