Tag: Lake George

Abigail May’s Visit to Ticonderoga in July 1800

Late last month, we hosted the Fifth Annual Fort Ticonderoga Teacher Institute. This year’s Institute titled “Last of the Mohicans: Early American History and Literature” used the novel The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper to explore themes related to the French siege and capture of Fort William Henry in August 1757. While […]

Witness the French Military Campaign to Capture Lake George on 260th Anniversary

Join Fort Ticonderoga for a one-day living history event Saturday, March 25th to witness how French soldiers, Canadians, and Native warriors prepare for an attack on Fort William Henry on March 16, 1757. From wool leggings and moccasins to snowshoes and toboggans, explore traditional tools and supplies that were vital to winter survival on the […]

View of the Ruins of Ticonderoga Forts on Lake Champlain

The earliest-known published image of the ruins of Fort Ticonderoga is View of the Ruins of Ticonderoga Forts on Lake Champlain, a line engraving by Gideon Fairman after a sketch by Hugh Reinagle published in Analectic Magazine, Philadelphia, vol. II, no. 4 (April 1818), frontispiece, opp. p. 273.  Artist Hugh Reinagle (ca. 1788-1834) probably visited the […]

Daniel Dwight’s Powder Horn

One of the most interesting genres of American art that survives from 18th century America is the engraved powder horn.  Horns fashioned for carrying gunpowder were supplied to military troops in both the French & Indian War and American Revolution.  Soldiers often engraved or carved designs on their horns, perhaps as a way of memorializing […]

Robert Fairchild and His Powder Horn

Powder horns are unique artifacts in that they have the ability to speak to a single person’s 18th-century military service unlike most other objects.  Muskets, swords, and other similar items, though important, are rarely able to connect people today nearly face-to-face with an individual person from the past.  What makes powder horns so interesting, and […]