Four Divisions formed at Fort Carillon-Rigaud's Attack of Fort William Henry

March 25, 2017

See French Regulars, Natives, and Canadians assemble at the fort, preparing to march across frozen Lake George to meet the enemy. Witness French soldiers building scaling ladders, artilleryman preparing the guns, stores, and ammunition as the army prepares for the surprise winter attack! Event tickets are $10.00; free admission is offered to Members of Fort Ticonderoga, children age 4 and younger, and Ambassador Pass Holders.

Visitor Schedule

10:00 AM Fort Ticonderoga Opens to Visitors
 
10:15 AM Key to the Continent Tour (Begins at the Large American Flag)
Discover the real story of 1757. Imagine Fort Carillon, later named Ticonderoga, filled inside and out with French soldiers, Canadians, and Native warriors, preparing for a surprise attack of Fort William Henry. Explore this chapter among many in the history of Ticonderoga, the Key to the Continent.
 
10:40 PM Family Guided Tour (Begins at the Large American Flag)
In this fun, active tour, explore the history of this great fort. Discover all the fun things to do during your visit.
 
11:00 AM Musket Demonstration (Fort Demonstration Area)
The musket had to be as versatile as the French soldiers themselves. See the parts of the French musket and how a weapon designed for battlefields in Europe served in a winter raid in America.
 
11:30 AM Scaling Ladders to Carry to Fort William Henry (Parade Ground)
If you can’t batter a fort wall down…climb over it! Rung by rung, see how three-piece scaling ladders were built in the hope of capturing Fort William Henry in the depths of winter.
 
12:30PM Fife & Drum Corps Performance (Inside the Parade Ground)
Listen to stirring tunes that eased the drudgery of a long march, or the many calls that regulated activity in the fort. Explore how drumbeats, and lyric songs created an 18th-century world of French military music.
 
1:00 PM Vive Le Roi! French Regiments at Carillon (Mars Education Center)
Join Senior Director of Interpretation, Stuart Lilie, to examine the regiments of French soldiers who built and defended Carillon. Look beyond their service in the French & Indian War to the broader history of these regiments. How did the defense of Canada fit into these regiments' fight for France in the 18th century?
 
2:00 PM Musket Demonstration (Fort Demonstration Area)
The musket had to be as versatile as the French soldiers themselves. See the parts of the French musket and how a weapon designed for battlefields in Europe served in a winter raid in America.
 
2:30 PM Carillon: Fascines, Gabions, and Platforms. (Parade Ground)
While this recreated fort is made of stones, see what the original walls of the fort would have looked like. Watch as soldiers use sticks, picks, shovels, and saws to construct fortified walls. Dive in and help soldiers construct gabions, platforms, and fascines.
 
3:00 PM Key to the Continent Tour (Begins at the Large American Flag)
Discover the real story of 1757. Imagine Fort Carillon, later named Ticonderoga, filled inside and out with French soldiers, Canadians, and Native warriors, preparing for a surprise attack of Fort William Henry. Explore this chapter among many in the history of Ticonderoga, the Key to the Continent.
 
3:30 PM Fife & Drum Corps Performance (Parade Ground)
Listen to stirring tunes that eased the drudgery of a long march, or the many calls that regulated activity in the fort. Explore how drumbeats, and lyric songs created an 18th-century world of military music.
 
4:00 PM Site closes to visitors
 
Daily Life Programs

“How These Winter Expeditions are Equipped”(Ground Floor of the Officers’ Barracks)
Low winter temperatures in the Champlain Valley meant that travel by boat was obsolete.  Instead, Rigaud ordered his entire army to march down frozen Lake Champlain. Witness the work of making moccasins to equip soldiers for the cold conditions. See the process of lacing snowshoes to support soldiers on three to four feet of snow.
 
Soldiers’ Dinner (Camp Kitchen in Front of the Fort Walls)
What happened to the bread? Discover how crop failure spelled real trouble for Canadians and French soldiers alike in 1757. See how food played a tremendous roll in the execution of campaigns.
 
Soldier’s Carpentry (Ground Floor of the Officers’ Barracks)
See how even at a remote post like Ticonderoga, skilled carpenters and joiners were able to furnish the barracks with proper furniture for soldiers. Watch the woodchips fly during the construction of soldier’s beds and other useful items.
 
Musket Maintenance (Guard Room)
Whether muskets, grenadier muskets, or hunting fusils, each shot of black powder left fouling which ate away at the gun unless cleaned off. Watch as hot water, grease, and a little brick dust keep these weapons working; lock, stock and barrel.
 
Soldier’s Quarters (Ground Floor of the Soldiers’ Barracks and Officers’ Barracks)
Which is more important to you: staying warm or personal space? See how French soldiers lived in their quarters inside the barracks and see how messes of soldiers worked together to keep each other in fighting shape.
 
Officer’s Quarters (Second Floor of the Officers’ Barracks)
Even roughing it on campaign, a French officer was still a gentleman. With soldiers’ rations, brandy, and a pound of chocolate, see what perks made officers’ life more comfortable.
 
Exhibitions
 
•Pork, Pigeon, & Pottery (Ground Floor of the Soldiers’ Barracks)
•It Would Make a Heart of Stone Melt (Ground Floor of the Soldiers’ Barracks)
•Iron and Stone (Ground Floor of the Soldiers’ Barracks)
•The Last Argument of Kings (Mars Education Center)