• One Destination,
    Endless Adventures
    Your Adventure Awaits
    at Fort Ticonderoga

  • One Destination,
    Endless Adventures
    Your Adventure Awaits
    at Fort Ticonderoga

  • One Destination,
    Endless Adventures
    Your Adventure Awaits
    at Fort Ticonderoga

  • One Destination,
    Endless Adventures
    Your Adventure Awaits
    at Fort Ticonderoga

Fort Ticonderoga and Mount Defiance are open Tuesday-Sunday May 7-October 30, 2022! 

Aerial of Fort Ticonderoga

Spend the Day, Discover the Beauty,
& Experience the History

Buy one day admission, visit the next day free!

Open Rain or Shine

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  • aerial view of fort ticonderoga. Photo credit Carl Heilman II

    May

    28

    Daily Programs & Outdoor Exploration

    Every day is an event at Fort Ticonderoga and every year is a new experience! This year, Fort Ticonderoga debuts a new chapter in its story. Discover innovative storytelling on […]

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  • Military interpreters pulling a cannon through the Fort Ticonderoga archway

    May

    28

    Memorial Day Weekend Commemoration

    Join Fort Ticonderoga to pay tribute to the men and women who lost their lives in service to their country during the American Revolution. Fort Ticonderoga will pay tribute to […]

    See More
  • Carillon boat tour

    May

    28

    Carillon Boat Cruises

    Enjoy sweeping vistas of Vermont’s Green Mountains and New York’s Adirondack Mountains during a 75-minute narrated boat tour aboard the Carillon. Let our friendly and experienced staff be your guide to […]

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All Upcoming Events

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This week’s #ManuscriptMonday document (MS.6013) is a “Revolutionary Claim” for Israel Harris, dated May 22, 1833! Various pension acts were passed in the 19th century for service in the American Revolution. This particular claim was created as a result of an act passed on June 7, 1832, which extended benefits to any officer or soldier that had served in the “continental line, State troops, volunteers, or militia” for more than six months. Israel Harris began his service in 1775, where he was among the troops that captured Fort Ticonderoga from the British, and later went on to serve as a captain of a company in Benjamin Simonds’ Berkshire County Regiment of Massachusetts Militia. This document certifies that Harris served as a captain in the American Revolution, which entitles him to a $240 yearly pension for the rest of his life. Harris died in 1836.

This document has been cataloged as part of the "Opening the Vault: Pathways of Accessibility to Ticonderoga's Hidden Collections" grant supported by the @nehgov National Endowment for the Humanities, and can be found on our online database in the link below. #TiconderogaCollections #OpeningTheVault

https://fortticonderoga.pastperfectonline.com/archive/F8AB3431-6166-4E59-A1BD-186270338133
The Carillon has returned to Fort Ticonderoga and boat cruises start this Friday! Explore some of the most archaeologically rich waters in North America while surrounded by breathtaking lake views, commanding mountains, and the majestic fort. https://conta.cc/3NwALSg
The Carillon is calling your name! Fort Ticonderoga's 1920's-style tour boat is making its return and daily cruises will begin next Friday, May 27th! Click the link in our bio to purchase your tickets today! https://14762a.blackbaudhosting.com/14762a/Carillon-Boat-Cruise-27May2022
This week's #ManuscriptMonday document is a letter from Jonathan Trumbull to Philip Skene! Skene was an officer in the British military who served in several campaigns in the French and Indian War, including both the failed 1758 attack and successful 1759 capture of Fort Carillon, now Fort Ticonderoga. The same year, Skene began securing a sizable estate in upstate New York, which he named Skenesborough, which he later lobbied to be the heart of a new northern colony. Shortly after the outbreak of the American Revolution and the capture of Fort Ticonderoga, in May 1775, Skene’s estate was seized and his son Andrew was arrested. Skene himself was captured and imprisoned by the Americans that June returning from England. On September 27th, 1776, over a year after his capture, Connecticut Governor Trumbull wrote this letter to notify Skene that he was finally being freed in a prisoner exchange with the British for James Lovell, a future Massachusetts delegate to the Continental Congress. While Skene had regained his freedom, he ultimately never regained his estate; it was confiscated by the State of New York, which accused him of treason. The town of Skenesborough is today known as Whitehall.

This document (MS.1983) has been cataloged as part of the "Opening the Vault: Pathways of Accessibility to Ticonderoga's Hidden Collections" grant supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities @nehgov , and can be found on our online database in the link in bio. #TiconderogaCollections #OpeningTheVault

https://fortticonderoga.pastperfectonline.com/archive/14D12B17-A8DD-464B-8F34-950304946820
#HappySpring! The magnolia are officially in bloom in the King’s Garden!