Fort Ticonderoga to Commemorate the Sacrifices of American Soldiers during Memorial Day Remembrance Ceremony

Learn how the American Army in 1777 defended liberty

Fort Ticonderoga will remember the service of the armed forces of the United States on the very grounds where so many American soldiers paid the ultimate price for freedom. Discover the story of the American Army in 1777 and how it rebuilt itself at Ticonderoga to defend liberty during living history programs and demonstrations throughout Memorial Day weekend, May 25-27.

“Join a hive of activity as citizens turned soldiers build extensive lines of defenses across the Ticonderoga peninsula and beyond to try to secure this vital stronghold from the British. Throughout the weekend, visitors will witness the labor of liberty as soldiers from the Continental Army bring to life this defining story through military drill, historic trades, and fatigue duties such as carpentry,” said Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO.

On Sunday and Monday, guests can experience narrated scenic boat tours aboard the Carillon and sail the same shores of Lake Champlain that American sailors did in 1777.

Fort Ticonderoga will hold a solemn ceremony on Memorial Day at 11 a.m. to remember fallen American soldiers.

A full line-up of activities and programs offered throughout the weekend include daily tours in the fort, King’s Garden, and museum exhibition spaces; historic trades programs; ongoing living history programs; thrilling weapons demonstrations; the Mount Defiance experience; and the Carillon Battlefield hiking trail. A full schedule can be found at www.fortticonderoga.org.

A 10% general admissions discount will be given to active duty military members with proof of service for this special weekend event.

About Fort Ticonderoga:

Welcoming visitors since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2,000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched Revolutionary War era earthworks surviving in America. As a multi-day destination and the premier place to learn more about our nation’s earliest years and America’s military heritage, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year with an economic impact of more than $12 million annually and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year, and is open for daily visitation May through October. Fort Ticonderoga is supported in part through generous donations and with some general operating support made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Photo: Copyright and photo credit Fort Ticonderoga.

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Fort Ticonderoga Offers New Experiences and Multi-Day Visit in 2019

Must-see destination exposes guests of all ages to endless adventure

Every day is an event at Fort Ticonderoga and every year is a new experience. Fort Ticonderoga, a historic site, museum, and family destination encourages visitors to build their perfect adventure in America’s most historic landscape, opens for the season beginning on Saturday, May 4.

This year, Fort Ticonderoga debuts a new chapter in its story. Explore the French Army’s defense against the British invasion, which climaxed in the 1758 epic Battle of Carillon as both empires fight for control of North America. Thrill at the power of artillery and crackle of muskets through daily weapons demonstrations and explore programs, new exhibits, gardens, historic trades, and other family adventures across the 2000-acre scenic historic property. New special events and reenactments in 2019 make Ticonderoga a bucket-list American destination to explore history on a grand scale.

“Fort Ticonderoga is a must-see destination, a center of learning, and an interactive, multi-faceted experience,” said Beth Hill, president and CEO. “It’s exploring the beautiful gardens, finding adventure in our signature events, marching with the Fifes and Drums, and learning about a historic trade. It’s a visit through the reconstructed fort, a stroll overlooking Lake Champlain and the Green Mountains of Vermont, and an afternoon in our exhibit galleries exploring our premier collections.”

Daily programs bring to life epic chapters of history and signature stories through new interactive programs and world-class museum exhibits, boat tours aboard the Carillon, living history events, special programs, lush gardens, Mount Defiance tours, hands-on family activities, hiking trails, and more.

2019 Highlights Include:

Carillon Boat Cruise: Enjoy gorgeous, sweeping vistas of Vermont’s Green Mountains and New York’s Adirondack Mountains during a 75-minute narrated boat tour. Regional beer and wine are available for purchase.

The French Are Coming: The war for North America is raging between the French and British Empires. Fort Carillon (later named Ticonderoga) is hotly contested.  March with soldiers as they prepare for battle and explore the new exhibition 1758:  Decision at Carillon.

New Interactive Family Program: In July and August, participate in an active NEW family program Voyage New France: A Family Adventure and help soldiers with their daily duties. Receive awards for completing the tasks. Take a guided tour designed especially for families.

Lush Historic Gardens and Friendly Animals: Immerse your senses in the colors and scents of a unique American country estate and explore Ticonderoga’s story after the Revolution. Visit the King’s Garden or make memories with your family in a NEW garden designed especially for children.  Discover our heritage breed animals including oxen Mick and Mack and Dominque chickens.

Breathtaking Views: Visit Mount Defiance to witness a birds-eye view of Fort Ticonderoga’s epic historic landscape. Whether you hike up the mountain in the footsteps of General Burgoyne’s troops or make the easy drive to the top in your car, you’ll savor the spectacular beauty of America’s most historic landscape. Discover how this summit shaped America’s history during the “Mount Defiance: Witness to History,” offered daily at 4:00 p.m.

“In our continued quest for excellence in the historic destination experience, we are very proud to welcome more than 75,000 visitors each year – building family memories, fostering enjoyment in our site’s beauty, and inspiring visitors to discover the power of the past and its meaning to us today,” said Hill.

Fort Ticonderoga and Mount Defiance are open daily from May 4- October 31, 2019 from 9:30 am until 5:00 pm (last ticket sold at 4:30 pm). 2019 special events, programs and reenactments are presented throughout the year. General admission tickets and special event tickets are available online and can be found by visiting www.fortticonderoga.org.  Tickets include two-consecutive day admissions.  Enhancement experiences such as boat tours and evening programs are an additional charge.

About Fort Ticonderoga:

Welcoming visitors since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2,000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched Revolutionary War era earthworks surviving in America. As a multi-day destination and the premier place to learn more about our nation’s earliest years and America’s military heritage, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year with an economic impact of more than $12 million annually and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year, and is open for daily visitation May through October. Fort Ticonderoga is supported in part through generous donations and with some general operating support made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Photos: Photo Credit and Copyright Fort Ticonderoga.

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Preservation is Always

Earlier this week as fire consumed much of the roof of Notre Dame cathedral in Paris the world watched with sinking hearts. The staff of Fort Ticonderoga watched with an added sense of pain and anxiety because it represented some of our worst professional fears and an event we plan and prepare for on a daily basis.

Of course accidents, destruction, and ruin are a part of any historic site. These events are often quite literally burnt into the histories of the places we preserve. Fort Ticonderoga suffered two catastrophic demolitions, purposefully set during wartime, in 1759 and 1777, in addition to accidents such as a fire that ripped through the officer’s barracks in 1760. These have forever left their mark on the structures of Fort Ticonderoga that survived them. From the ruins, objects present at these events bear the unmistakable and irreversible marks of this violence which forms a part of their history.

These events, however, were in the past. It is our job as heritage professionals today to prevent such damage. This work is increased in scope and nature by the collections of artifacts that have been accumulated by the museum over the hundred years we have existed as an institution. In addition to physical structures, we now care for textiles, weaponry, equipment, paintings, prints, manuscripts, and books spanning a wide range of ages and materials with their own unique needs.

While the catastrophic fire, floods, or other incidents are the worst nightmare of those in our profession, we also fight a much pernicious and often more subtle enemy, the constant march of time. All of the objects and structures we care for are subject to the degrading effects of time. These objects and structures represent a physical link to our past. We preserve and often protect the tangible and through them, the intellectual and emotional, reminders of worlds and peoples gone before us. This history is powerful, stirring, humbling, as well as challenging, and sometimes chilling, but it is ours as a nation, as a continent, as a species.

Fort Ticonderoga staff works hard every day to ensure that these treasures will be here tomorrow. Events like that in Notre Dame galvanize support and shine a light on the work of heritage professionals like collections specialists, curators, conservators, preservation architects, and others, but our work is ongoing. This is real work, such as controlling temperature and humidity to make sure the environment is right to slow harmful conditions. We ensure fragile components of objects are supported, that stresses on old materials are managed and that the opportunities for damage are limited whenever possible. We also prepare for the more catastrophic events by developing disaster management plans to implement in case of scenarios that we shudder to think of happening at our museum. We work with partners in state and national institutions to bring our practices and staff training up to industry standards and to prepare us, and other museum staff, to make the right decisions and follow these standards when tragedy does strike.

The support Notre Dame has received to rebuild and restore the cathedral is remarkable and heartening, evidence that we as a people value our shared cultural landscape. But it is also a reminder that it often takes a tragedy to activate this generosity. The cathedral had struggled to raise the funding necessary for restoration that was ongoing when the fire occurred. Delayed maintenance does not just leave a structure, or collection, looking poorer, it is often the cause of disaster. An example from Fort Ticonderoga was reported in 1774 by the fort’s commander who blamed deferred maintenance for the collapse of the supply room in the original fort. Today, Fort Ticonderoga deals with the constant talks of maintaining massive stone walls of the reconstructed fort, which combine 18th- and 20th-century history, against the effects of time and weather.

A case in point for us is the 1826 Pavilion overlooking Lake Champlain. This stately home was built for the owner of Fort Ticonderoga, who initiated the first historic preservation effort in the 19th century. Unoccupied since the late 1980s, Fort Ticonderoga has made progress to document the structure and plan for its future. The loss of the building, its stories, and its presence as part of the historic landscape through accident or deterioration, was not acceptable. It represents the challenges we face writ large. Fortunately, through private and public support we have been able to begin the work of restoring the Pavilion.

The news from France, and elsewhere across the world where accidents have caused the irreplaceable loss of artifacts and historic sites, gives us cause for reflection and re-dedication to our work. But it is also a time to thank those that have supported us, both private and public supporters, in the daily work we do as a cultural institution. This ongoing, never-ending, task of preservation and preparation is thanks to the support given by thousands of people from across the US and the world who pay admission, who become museum members, and who support special projects across the site through their generosity and belief that cultural institutions and historic places matter.

We encourage everyone to contribute to restoring icons like Notre Dame, as well as the historic sites and museums in their own communities, in the wake of tragedy. We also encourage the thought of ongoing needs of cultural institutions to prevent the conditions that lead to tragedy and give our staff the resources to do the vital and daily work of ensuring that the cultural patrimony of the world will be around for future generations.

To support Fort Ticonderoga’s work in collection care and historic preservation please visit (https://www.fortticonderoga.org/join-support/donate) or call Beth L. Hill, President and CEO, 518-586-1708 or email bhill@fort-ticonderoga.org.

Photos:
1. As stewards of cultural resources, we are answerable to posterity for the preservation of historic artifacts and structures. The Pavilion, begun in 1826, is just the most visible preservation project underway right now to prevent the effects of time, and anticipate accidents, to ensure these places will remain available and accessible for generations to come.
2. Catastrophic events leave their mark. This French cup and saucer bear the charred surfaces, cracked glaze, and globs of molten glass that speak to their presence during a dramatic fire, probably that which followed the French demolition of the powder magazine in 1759.
3. Today Fort Ticonderoga’s collection staff works each day to preserve thousands of artifacts in the museum’s collection as well as our structures and historic landscape. Tasks as simple as monitoring climate and making storage decisions are part of the ongoing job of preservation undertaken each day at museums like Fort Ticonderoga.
4. After war, fire, and neglect, Fort Ticonderoga was a shell of its former self by the early 20th century. The founders of the museum faced significant challenges and decisions when restoring the fortification and our staff continues their work to care for both the original fabric of the fort and reconstructions from the 20th century.

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Disaster Preparedness and Response

When cultural resources and objects are destroyed, we mourn the loss of something irreplaceable. As stewards of cultural objects, Fort Ticonderoga plays a role in preserving our cultural identity. It is up to museum staff to adhere to preventative measures, respond quickly and efficiently, and provide support through disaster recovery efforts. The safety of people is always the most important consideration in addition to minimizing the risk to the museum collections that we preserve for future generations. A current, comprehensive disaster preparedness and emergency response plan helps a museum to assess and manage risk, protect human life, and recover from natural and manmade disasters. Creating a plan and training museum staff, governing authority members, and volunteers on their roles within it ensures that a museum will be equipped to handle even the worst-case scenarios.

Please explore the below resource links for more information on disaster preparedness and creating or updating an emergency response plan for your institution:

https://www.aam-us.org/programs/ethics-standards-and-professional-practices/disaster-preparedness-and-emergency-response-plan/

https://dhpsny.org/resources#Disaster%20Preparedness

https://ccaha.org/sites/default/files/attachments/2019-04/National%20Resource%20Guide%20for%20Disaster%20Preparedness%202019.pdf

https://icom.museum/en/activities/heritage-protection/emergency-preparedness-and-response/

https://www.iccrom.org/wp-content/uploads/Guide-to-Risk-Managment_English.pdf

https://www.amnh.org/our-research/natural-science-collections-conservation/general-conservation/emergency-preparedness

Photo: Fort Ticonderoga museum staff trained in disaster response and recovery when Fort Ticonderoga hosted a workshop run by the Documentary Heritage & Preservation Services of New York in 2017. Training paired with a updated plan is essential for moving into action quickly in the event of a disaster.

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Fort Ticonderoga Receives Grant Funding for New 2019 Exhibit “Ticonderoga, A Legacy”

Fort Ticonderoga has received funding from the International Paper Foundation to support an initiative that tells the story of Ticonderoga’s lasting cultural impact in the new exhibit “Ticonderoga, A Legacy” which explores the tradition of Ticonderoga through popular and military culture over two centuries, including the U.S. Navy vessels that have borne its name. “Ticonderoga; A Legacy” will open for public viewing as Fort Ticonderoga opens for daily visitation on May 4, 2019.

“This exhibit explores the ways in which Ticonderoga has been evoked, remembered, and memorialized from the end of the Revolution through the end of the 20th century,” said Matthew Keagle, curator, Fort Ticonderoga. “From Thomas Cole to Thomas Edison, Ticonderoga has captivated and inspired artists and thinkers from around the world. This exhibit will trace Ticonderoga’s place in art and culture through its significant collection of artifacts, books, and images related to the legacy and memory of Ticonderoga in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.”

“Fort Ticonderoga is grateful to the International Paper Foundation for their continued generous support,” said Beth Hill, president and CEO, Fort Ticonderoga. “Their investment results in our ability to expand our museum educational reach and broaden our visitors experience, thereby generating increased economic impact and educational value to a growing audience and the community we serve.”

Fort Ticonderoga holds one of North America’s premier collections of 18th-century military material and cultural artifacts. In 2019, visit new exhibits that highlight our rich history, rarely-seen treasures, and discover thousands of epic stories.

About Fort Ticonderoga

Welcoming visitors since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2,000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched Revolutionary War era earthworks surviving in America. As the premier place to learn more about our nation’s earliest years and America’s military heritage, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year with an economic impact of more than $12 million annually and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year, and is open for daily visitation May through October. Fort Ticonderoga is supported in part through generous donations and with some general operating support made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo: Fort Ticonderoga has received funding from the International Paper Foundation to support an initiative that tells the story of Ticonderoga’s lasting cultural impact in the new exhibit “Ticonderoga, A Legacy.” The exhibit will open for public viewing on May 4, 2019.

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Fort Ticonderoga Director of Museum Collections Receives 2019 Award of Merit from Museum Association of New York 

Miranda Peters, Fort Ticonderoga Director of Museum Collections, was recently awarded the Museum Association of New York (MANY) Rising Star Award for Collections/Exhibitions. The award was presented at the MANY Annual Meeting in Cooperstown, NY.

Peters joined Fort Ticonderoga’s museum leadership staff four years ago to document, preserve, and make accessible the museum’s holdings, considered one of the world’s most comprehensive collections of military material culture from the 18th century. Under her leadership, numerous prestigious grants were secured to expand the collection staff to undertake challenging projects, preserve the objects, and make them accessible to the world on a new online collections database.

“It is such an honor to receive this recognition from MANY,” said Peters. “The entire team in the Collections Department has undertaken transformative work to document, preserve, and make accessible Fort Ticonderoga’s remarkable collections. We have a commitment to share our lessons learned with our peers in the museum community and to provoke an active discussion about the past and its importance to present and future generations.”

“With constant drive and always seeing opportunities in challenges, Peters has tackled several significant projects,” said Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO. “This recognition from MANY reaffirms what we already know that Miranda Peters is a leader in the museum field. Her work has revolutionized our ability to make our museum holdings a singular educational resource for our staff, academic partners, historians, K-12 educators and students, and others who utilize them. As an institution, we have made collections management a priority to ensure that our holdings are cared for and made available today and for posterity.”

Peters also serves as editor-in-chief of the museum’s collections-based publications. She has transformed three collections storage facilities and developed a new archaeological study room where researchers have access to thousands of 18th-century archaeological objects recovered from the historic site throughout the 20th century. Her creative approach to making the best use of space nearly doubled the available shelving for the museum’s collections. Further, Miranda addressed conservation priorities, sought special funds for the work in partnership with the museum’s development staff, and developed plans to ensure the proper care of museum holdings. Prior to serving as Director of Museum Collections at Fort Ticonderoga, Peters was the Collection Manager for The Preservation Society of Newport County in RI. She holds a Master of Arts in Decorative Arts, Design History and Material Culture from the Bard Graduate Center.

About Fort Ticonderoga

Welcoming visitors since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2,000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched Revolutionary War era earthworks surviving in America. As the premier place to learn more about our nation’s earliest years and America’s military heritage, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year with an economic impact of more than $12 million annually and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year, and is open for daily visitation May through October. Fort Ticonderoga is supported in part through generous donations and with some general operating support made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo: Miranda Peters, Fort Ticonderoga Director of Museum Collections, was recently awarded the Museum Association of New York (MANY) Rising Star Award for Collections/Exhibitions. The award was presented at the MANY Annual Meeting in Cooperstown, NY.

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Fort Ticonderoga Receives Grant to Support 2019 Graduate Fellowship

The Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership has recently awarded Fort Ticonderoga a grant to support a graduate-level student intern to develop historical content about the role of the Champlain Valley in early American history from 1609-1815, with an emphasis on the French & Indian War and the American Revolution, the focus of the 2020 Fort Ticonderoga Teacher Institute.

The 2019 Edward W. Pell Graduate Fellow in Education, supported by the grant, is Emily Grenier. Emily is a Master’s candidate in American history at the University of Delaware. She is also pursuing a Museum Studies Certificate. The focus of her historical research is Colonial North America and the French Atlantic World.

“Support from the Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership will provide Emily with an opportunity to delve into the rich archival and object resources in the Fort Ticonderoga collection,” said Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO. “Emily will also have an opportunity to develop and acquire skills related to using material culture, archival resources, place-based education, and current best practices in education to teach teachers how to engage students in the rich 17th– through early 19th-century history of the Champlain Valley and beyond.”

The Graduate Fellowship program serves as an opportunity to work with Fort Ticonderoga’s professional staff as part of a team-approach to all major projects. Professional development opportunities during the fellowships will include visits from outside scholars and field trips. In general, project-specific work will encompass about 50% of the fellow’s time. The remaining half will be taken up with day-to-day tasks in their department, providing a wide-ranging experience working at a historic site and museum.

This project is funded by an agreement (P18AC01302J) awarded by the United States National Park Service (NPS) to the New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission in partnership with the Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership. NEIWPCC manages CVNHP’s personnel, contract, grant, and budget tasks and provides input on the program’s activities.

About Fort Ticonderoga

Welcoming visitors since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2,000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched Revolutionary War era earthworks surviving in America. As the premier place to learn more about our nation’s earliest years and America’s military heritage, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year with an economic impact of more than $12 million annually and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year, and is open for daily visitation May through October. Fort Ticonderoga is supported in part through generous donations and with some general operating support made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association Photo: Theresa Ball from the University of Washington was the 2017 Edward W. Pell Graduate Fellow in Research at Fort Ticonderoga.

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Fort Ticonderoga Awards Grant to North Country History Student to Attend National History Day Camp

Fort Ticonderoga has awarded a grant to a North Country history student to attend the National History Academy during the summer of 2019. Cole Siebels, a freshman at Gouverneur High School in Gouverneur, N.Y. was awarded the scholarship after placing as a top performer at the recent National History Day North Country competition held at Fort Ticonderoga on March 2, 2019. The grant is made possible by John T Beaty, a generous long-time Fort Ticonderoga supporter. The scholarship will be available annually to one eligible North Country student who is an outstanding North Country National History Day participant.

The National History Academy is a 5-week summer program. Participants explore the history of the United States from the Colonial Era through the Civil Rights Movement. Through field trips to historical places in Washington DC and the surrounding region, students gain a deeper understanding of the foundations of American democracy and the responsibilities of citizenship through experiential learning.

“Fort Ticonderoga is thrilled to offer Cole Siebels this remarkable opportunity to participate in the National History Academy,” said Beth L. Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO.  “Through the National History Day program, and now through this scholarship opportunity, we are a platform and resource for students to participate in an on-going conversation about history and its meaning to us today.  The National History Academy is partner program which shares our museum’s commitment to engage students and foster a more engaged citizenry in a deeper understanding of our past.”

About Fort Ticonderoga

Welcoming visitors since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2,000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched Revolutionary War era earthworks surviving in America. As the premier place to learn more about our nation’s earliest years and America’s military heritage, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year with an economic impact of more than $12 million annually and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year, and is open for daily visitation May through October. Fort Ticonderoga is supported in part through generous donations and with some general operating support made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo: Cole Siebels, a freshman at Gouverneur High School in Gouverneur, New York, was awarded a scholarship to attend the National History Academy for a 5-week program this summer. This scholarship was made possible by generous long-time Fort Ticonderoga supporter, John T Beaty.

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The Fort Ticonderoga Association Presents the Ticonderoga Award for a Continental Vision to Lee and Bob Woodruff and the Bob Woodruff Foundation

The Fort Ticonderoga Association recently awarded Lee and Bob Woodruff and the Bob Woodruff Foundation the 2019 Ticonderoga Award for a Continental Vision for their significant work helping wounded service members, veterans and their families thrive long after they return home.

“Fort Ticonderoga is thrilled to honor hometown heroes Lee and Bob Woodruff and the Bob Woodruff Foundation for their impactful work,” said Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO. “Our mission is to preserve, educate and provoke an active discussion of the past and its importance to present and future generations. We foster an on-going dialogue about subjects, citizens and soldiers through our nation’s military heritage. Connecting the extraordinary work that the Woodruff’s are undertaking to support soldiers and veterans was an obvious connection to Ticonderoga where we explore issues surrounding service. These issues are as hotly debated today as they were during our nation’s founding era.”

“Ticonderoga is one of the most pivotal places in our nation where we fought for democracy,” said Lee Woodruff. “We are honored that The Fort Ticonderoga Association has recognized the Bob Woodruff Foundation as an organization that keeps alive the legacy of caring for American veterans.”

The Bob Woodruff Foundation (BWF) was founded in 2006 after Bob Woodruff, a reporter, was hit by a roadside bomb while covering the war in Iraq. Since then, BWF has led an enduring call to action for people to stand up for heroes and meet the emerging and long-term needs of today’s veterans. To date, BWF has invested more than $57 million to Find, Fund and Shape™ programs that have empowered impacted veterans, service members and their family members, across the nation.

For more information, visit bobwoodrufffoundation.org or follow them on Twitter at @Stand4Heroes.

About Fort Ticonderoga

Welcoming visitors since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2,000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched Revolutionary War era earthworks surviving in America. As the premier place to learn more about our nation’s earliest years and America’s military heritage, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year with an economic impact of more than $12 million annually and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year, and is open for daily visitation May through October. Fort Ticonderoga is supported in part through generous donations and with some general operating support made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo: The Fort Ticonderoga Association awarded Lee and Bob Woodruff and the Bob Woodruff Foundation the 2019 Ticonderoga Award for a Continental Vision for their significant work helping wounded service members, veterans, and their families. Pictured: Lee and Bob Woodruff of the Bob Woodruff Foundation and Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President & CEO. Photo credit John Werner.

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Robert Rogers and his Rangers Return to Ticonderoga during Dramatic Reenactment

Rogers’ Personal Powder Horn on Display one day ONLY
Saturday, March 9, 2019

Robert Rogers and his rangers return to Fort Ticonderoga Saturday, March 9, 2019 through the dramatic 1758 Battle on Snowshoes reenactment.

The Battle on Snowshoes event vividly recreates the savage fight between Robert Rogers’ rangers, and a mixed French force of Native Warriors, Canadians, and French army soldiers on March 13, 1758. This event is designed to be a rich experience for guests of all ages as they explore this famous battle from a new perspective to learn fact from fiction.

Throughout the day, visitors will explore the French Garrison inside Fort Ticonderoga and tour through opposing camps of well-trained British rangers. Families can make their own tuque, or wool cap, like French soldiers donned in the winter months. Strap on your snowshoes and march out to the edge of the cleared land into the woods to discover the camp of Rogers’ rangers. During the 2:00 pm battle, become immersed as the rangers make a brave stand against superior odds in hectic tree-to-tree fighting.

A special exhibit will highlight material associated with the famous Robert Rogers and his legacy across the Atlantic world. On display will be Rogers’ own powder horn, one of the only objects directly associated with the legendary officer. Rogers’ horn was carved by John Bush, an African-American soldier from Massachusetts, who is one of the best known horn carvers of the French and Indian War.

“Robert Rogers’ reputation was perpetuated well after the conclusion of the war, in print and other media, particularly following the publication of his Journals from the conflict, which described the operations of him and his corps of rangers,” said Matthew Keagle, Curator at Fort Ticonderoga. “This exhibit features an early and rare Dublin edition of Rogers’ Journals along with a London engraving that imagines the appearance of the famous ranger officer. Artifacts like these secured Rogers’ fame in Britain as well as America. Both objects speak to the depth and importance of the Fort Ticonderoga museum collections.”

Background
Major Robert Rogers force of both volunteers from the 27th foot, and his own rangers headed out on an extended scout from Fort Edward along Lake George, following an attack on a similar patrol from Captain Israel Putnam’s Connecticut rangers. Hiking on snowshoes due to the three feet of snow, the tracks of Roger’s force were spotted on their march up the west side of Lake George. Near the north end of Lake George, Major Rogers’ advanced scouts spotted their French counterparts. Rogers and his Rangers took up positions in a ravine, setting his force in ambuscade to await whatever French patrol would come to meet him.

The French patrol that met Roger’s men proved far larger than he imagined, and in this Battle on Snowshoes, the rangers’ ambush was itself surrounded and overwhelmed. In deep woods on deep snow, the rangers were forced to retreat with heavy casualties as the French regulars, canadians, and natives pressed home their attack. Despite brave stands along the way, this retreat quickly became chaotic as rangers, Roger’s included, ran for their lives from superior numbers of French.

Fort Ticonderoga: America’s Fort™
Fort Ticonderoga is an independent nonprofit educational organization which serves its mission to ensure that present and future generations learn from the struggles, sacrifices, and victories that shaped the nations of North America and changed world history. It serves this mission by preserving and enhancing its historic structures, collections, gardens and landscapes; and educating the public as it learns about the history of Fort Ticonderoga. Welcoming visitors since 1909, it preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched 18th-century earthworks surviving in America.  Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year and is open for daily visitation May through October. Fort Ticonderoga is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and pursues its vision to be the premier cultural destination in North America. Visit www.FortTiconderoga.org for a full list of ongoing programs or call 518-585-2821. Fort Ticonderoga is located at 102 Fort Ti Road, Ticonderoga, New York.

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Photo: Robert Rogers and his rangers return to Fort Ticonderoga Saturday, March 9, 2019 through the dramatic 1758 Battle on Snowshoes reenactment.

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