Preparing for the Coming Campaign 

Living History Event on January 19, 2019

preparing for the coming campaign soldiers with muskets

Experience Fort Ticonderoga in the beauty of winter during its Winter Quarters next living history event Preparing for the Coming Campaign on Saturday, January 19, 2019.  The event will bring to life the story of American soldiers at Ticonderoga in the year 1777 as they prepare for a British attack.

Aware that their resources are limited and manpower scarce, meet soldiers in the wintertime fort and immerse yourself into the struggle for liberty. Visitors can learn about the carpentry skills that were required to build and defend a Revolutionary era fort and examine rare artifacts from the winter of 1777 on display at a special pop-up exhibit in the warm Mars Education Center.

A full day of programs includes guided tours, weapons demonstrations, and historic trade programs. Discover the importance of chocolate for American soldiers and camp followers at Ticonderoga and enjoy a sample of colonial chocolate! For a full event schedule and other event details visit www.fort-ticonderoga.org or call 518-585-2821.

“Ticonderoga in the winter of 1776 into 1777 was an active post, filled with American soldiers achieving incredible feats of construction,” said Stuart Lilie, Vice President of Operations. “As snow piled up, carpenters built massive new barracks and artillerymen built carriages for the largest number of cannons ever at Ticonderoga. Even the frozen surface of Lake Champlain was a construction site, as soldiers built wood and stone piers for a bridge across the lake.”

Bring your family along to experience this exciting living history event during Fort Ticonderoga’s new schedule of programs during Winter Quarters season. From now through April, visitors will be immersed in a more intimate experience at Fort Ticonderoga. From living history events, insightful seminars, specialty programs, and hands-on workshops, guests will have the opportunity to explore Fort Ticonderoga during what was traditionally the “Winter Quarters” season for armies of the 18th century.

Fort Ticonderoga: America’s Fort™
Welcoming visitors since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2,000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched Revolutionary War era earthworks surviving in America. As the premier place to learn more about our nation’s earliest years and America’s military heritage, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year with an economic impact of more than $12 million annually and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year, and is open for daily visitation May through October. 

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo: The Preparing for the Coming Campaign Living History Event will take place on January 19, 2019 at Fort Ticonderoga. Visit www.fortticonderoga or call 518-585-2821 for more Winter Quarter events, programs, and seminars.

Posted in Collections, Education, Exhibits, Family Fun in the Adirondacks, Family programs, Fort Ticonderoga, Fort Ticonderoga Staff, Life Long Learning, Living History & Material Culture, Living History Event, Programs, Public Programs, Special Events, Tourist Destination, Winter Family Fun, Winter Quarters | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Preparing for the Coming Campaign 

3 Steps to a Better French Army Portrayal for the French & Indian War

By Vice President of Operations, Stuart Lilie

In 2019, Fort Ticonderoga will be portraying the year 1758, with daily on-going programs, weapons demonstrations, and guided tours. The year will also feature epic living history events bringing to life French soldiers serving right here at Fort Carillon (later named Ticonderoga). Sailing across the Atlantic Ocean, these French soldiers defended Canada for nearly five years, winning Pyrrhic victories against vastly larger British and Anglo-American armies. Equally fascinating is the blend of unique military cultures embodied in the clothing, equipment, and food of the French army soldier in North America. Here are three simple details that really bring the story of French soldiers to life.

  1. Havresac not Haversack  Everything a French soldier needed, extra clothing, personal items, & rations could be carried inside the gran haversac. These large bags are often shown in the period filled to the gills.

This distinction is more than just a ‘k,’ it’s a gulf between two completely different military systems. In his 1768 book, “A System for the Compleat Interior Management and Oeconomy of a Battalion of Infantry,” Captain Bennet Cuthbertson defined the British army haversack, saying, “…a Soldier cannot conveniently get through the Duties of a Campaign, without a Haversack of strong, coarse, grey linen (which is always issued as part of the Camp-equipage) to carry his bread and provisions on a March…”

In contrast, the French soldiers’ haversack was two distinct bags. In, “Institutions Militaire” from 1754, the haversacs’ dimensions and use was defined:

The Havresac of good and useful dimensions for Officers, Sergeants, and the same for soldiers, is a plain sack of linen 4 feet long, 2 feet, 6 inches wide at the corners, still giving him a hide/skin for normal usage to wrap up in for sleeping on campaign, and contains a small leather sack to carry cloths and keep out the rain. Closing the sack is a flap of the dimensions, closing with 4 buttons closing the outer part. It is 2 feet long and 1 foot wide. It would carry all that a Dragoon on foot would have independent of his personal equipment. The knapsack/haversack has a leather strap 2 feet long of Russia or buff leather, as wide as a waistbelt. The buckle is attached with another strap of Moroccan in the same width, 3 inches long sewn do the side the same distance from the opening. Above the strap, it folds over to keep out the rain, closed around the middle by a leather strap or cord. The little haversack is carried in the middle of the open space of the bag. The strap of the bag is carried over the right shoulder, but is long enough to be carried over both shoulders, which is less work. (1)

This soldier’s ration of tobacco is depicted in a small bag with two ties to close it. Collection of the Musee de la Armee. 

In English parlance, the French havresac is much closer to their snapsack or knapsack of the time. The gran and petit haversacs together were to carry all a soldier’s personal items. Blankets were not a standard issue item to French soldiers serving on the continent of Europe. Unique to French service, the gran havresac was large enough to serve as a sleeping bag. Blankets were issued as part of the colonial clothing issue to French soldiers in North America and were used in conjunction with their gran havresacs and bearskins in the winter.  It does beg the question, how were rations carried, if they didn’t have haversacks in the English sense? The answer is that rations were carried in the gran havresac as well, but likely in privately acquired linen bags. Some pieces of camp equipment, issued to individual British soldiers, like canteens, were issued to a tente, or chambree (or mess in English) of 8-10 French soldiers. In the case of canteens, or bidon, it was common for French soldiers, to procure gourd canteens for their personal use. It appears a similar practice was common for rations. The 1757 official watercolor of a soldier of the Berry regiment shows him enjoying a smoke, drawing his tobacco from a small bag with two ties closing it at the top. Tobacco, was a ration like any other in the French army. These small bags may well have been used more commonly to keep other rations like salt pork, flour, & all away from the sleeping soldier inside the gran havresac at night.

  1. Pea Soup and more Pea Soup

French army officers had a surprising diversity of foods available. Chevalier de la Pause of the Guyenne regiment noted officers’ rations as they prepared for campaign in the summer of 1755.

Given moreover to the commandant and major a barrel of pigs ears, two pots of goose thighs confit, and two barrels of wine and a parcel of groceries, thirty-two for them, and more a ham of each officer, two for the commandant, the same as the major, and in the place of the second ham each officer was given a wheel of gruyere cheese that was shared among all. Issued for stores to the major was one barrel of oil, one of vinegar, one of prunes, one of raisins and one crate of 50 pounds of soap, ten pounds of powder and eight pounds of lead.

Eating split pea soup and bread with the other members of you tent or barracks room was a daily ritual for French soldiers.

This was not the case for enlisted soldiers. In the spring of 1756, Chevaliar de la Pause outlined the soldiers’ rations for each soldier also per month:

60 pounds of bread

13 pounds of lard (salt-pork)

7 ½ pounds of peas

1 pot of brandy

1 pound of tobacco

These rations were either dry or salted, and so could be preserved without refrigeration. In the summer of 1755, this ration of flour often came as biscuit, a kin to ship’s biscuit in British service, or hard tack a century later. At established posts like Carillon, bake ovens were built to allow proper bakers to turn rations of flour into proper fresh bread. French soldiers ate a lot of bread, but other than bread, dried peas and salted pork were the bulk of their rations. This meant two to three meals a day consisted of split pea soup. Each mess of eight to ten French soldiers had a marmite or iron kettle and a gemelle or tinned-iron mess bowl. They shared these to cook with along with a bidon or tinned-iron canteen for all of them, their tent, and a pot ladle. This meant that a cornerstone of daily life for a French soldier was eating together with the members of his mess, sopping up split pea soup with bread or biscuit.

  1. Hats: Collect All Three!

If French army soldiers serving in North America lacked for anything, it wasn’t hats. The full dress uniform of a French soldier included his chapeau, a cocked hat of black felt, bound in wide faux gold or silver lace. This lace matched the color of the metal of the buttons on the coat and sleeved vest underneath. More important soldiers, like sergeants, were distinguished by fine, not faux gold or silver lace. While the cocked hat looks great, it really had to be preserved for full dress occasions, like mounting guard or battle itself. For messier duties, French soldiers’ had a bonnet, which later was called a bonnet de police, or fatigue cap in English. Article LXVII of the 1753, “Royal Ordinance, Covering Regulations on the Service of the Infantry on Campaign,” directly stated,

Blankets were issued by the colony of Canada in North America. For service in Europe these French soldiers are shown sleeping under their coats with their legs inside the gran havresac.

“When the troops are in camp, two or three men per mess, in vest and bonnet, will be conducted in good order for wood and straw, as the Officers& Sergeants command to this effect.” Generally, these bonnetwere made in the colors of their regimental coats, turned up in the color of the coat’s cuff.  The French naval ministry, which administered Canada, shipped brand new bonnet from France to go with new uniforms for French army soldiers arriving in 1755. These white bonnet were turned up at the bottom up with either blue or red wool cloth, to match the coat cuff colors of the six battalions arriving from France.  The only thing better than two hats…is three. French army solders received an annual clothing and equipment allotment from the colony of Canada. This was similar, but not identical, to what Canadian malice and colonial regulars received. This clothing included another bonnet, which French officers like Aide Major, Chevalier de la Pause noted as a bonnet d’laine. This hat was the tuque, the red wool knit cap worn in France by sailors and worn in Canada by most men. This bonnet or tuque was often made double layered and in the Canadian winter must have been a welcomed comfort from the cold. The tuque was also a tangible symbol of serving in North America. These many hats represent the many roles of French soldiers in America; well-disciplined regular soldiers, skilled laborers, and fighters in the varied seasons and country of North America.

1: All measurements are in Paris feet and inches, not English measure. A Parisian inch is approximately one and one-eight English inch.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

For more information on 2019 Fort Ticonderoga events, visit the events calendar.

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Fort Ticonderoga 2019 Fort Fever Series: First Program Presented January 13th

Fort Ticonderoga’s popular wintertime Fort Fever Series returns in 2019 and features programs led by Fort Ticonderoga museum staff who will share their latest research and cutting-edge discoveries.

The first program is presented on January 13, 2019 with “Half-Spanish, Part-Hungarian, & All-American: Cavalry Treatises, Saddles & Objects in Fort Ticonderoga’s Collection.”

Join Vice President of Public History, Stuart Lilie, to explore the incredible horse artifacts in Fort Ticonderoga’s collections and the unique stories of American saddlery that they tell.  The Collections of Fort Ticonderoga include saddles, documents and other pieces which record the ongoing evolution of American military saddlery beyond the long 18th century.

“Saddlery for cavalry in the new United States drew upon old traditions and new military fashions around the Atlantic world,” said Lilie. “American Cavalry officers and saddlers alike consciously sought out other horse cultures, as they refined American cavalry equipment in the era of Western expansion.”

Additional Programs:

February 10, 2019: Selective Service: Soldiers of Color in the Atlantic World
As part of Black History Month, Fort Ticonderoga Curator Matthew Keagle will explore how the armies of the early modern Atlantic World policed the boundaries of race and military service during an era of global imperial conflict. This program will provide context to the complex, and often contradictory, history of soldiers of color on both sides of the Atlantic ocean in the 18th century.

March 17, 2019: Remembering the Ladies: Anglo-American Women in the Lake Champlain Valley, 1759-1781
This Women’s History Month, join Museum Registrar Margaret Staudter as she examines the roles of women at Ticonderoga and in the Lake Champlain Valley during times of peace and times of war. Through historical accounts, documents, and artifacts uncover the stories of women hidden in the shadows of Fort Ticonderoga’s dramatic military history.

April 7, 2019: Lake Champlain’s Age of Steam
Join Director of Academic Programs Rich Strum for a program about the age of steam on Lake Champlain. From the first steamer that plied the waters of Lake Champlain in 1809 to the Ticonderoga that ceased operation in 1953, dozens of steamers moved passengers and freight up and down the lake, connecting communities and bringing early tourists to the region.

All Fort Fever programs take place in the Mars Education Center at 2:00 pm unless otherwise noted. Tickets are $10 per person and can be purchased at the door. Free admission is offered to Fort Ticonderoga Members and Ticonderoga Ambassador Pass Holders.

For more information on programs and events at Fort Ticonderoga, call 518-585-2821 or visit www.fortticonderoga.org.

Fort Ticonderoga: America’s Fort™
Welcoming visitors since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2,000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched Revolutionary War era earthworks surviving in America. As the premier place to learn more about our nation’s earliest years and America’s military heritage, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year with an economic impact of more than $12 million annually and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year, and is open for daily visitation May through October.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo: Photo credit Carl Heilman II, copyright Fort Ticonderoga.

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The Christmas Riot of 1776: Overlooked Moment of American Disunity

Fort Ticonderoga Reenacts the Conflict during December 15
Living History Event “RIOT! Yankees vs. Buckskins”

New Research Sheds Light on Surprising Divisions within the Revolutionary Army

Join Fort Ticonderoga on December 15, 2018, for the signature living history event “RIOT! Yankees vs. Buckskins.” Throughout the day, visitors will participate in engaging presentations, weapons demonstrations, historic trades, and living history vignettes. Watch the disunity between officers unfold during an intense riot that plagued the American army in 1776.

A special pop-up exhibit on display December 15 ONLY will present one of the garrison’s original orderly books. “These official documents which buried the details of the altercation and the riot between Pennsylvanians and Massachusetts soldiers has been known only circumstantially through two diaries and memoirs,” said Beth L. Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO. “The recent re-discovery of first-hand accounts, disregarded for over a century, help shed a new light on this surprising event. These sources will be used to recreate the events of Christmas day and explore the complex history of America’s remarkable struggle for Independence.”

Fort Ticonderoga Museum Curator Matthew Keagle recently discovered NEW evidence about this moment of American disunity. Sitting under noses of generations of historians is an event that shatters popular notions of the Revolutionary War. On Christmas day 1776, an altercation unfolded at Ticonderoga that resulted in American blood being shed by other Americans.

“Late on Christmas Day 1776, Pennsylvania soldiers attacked the camp of a Massachusetts Regiment and assaulted the regiment’s almost 60-year-old colonel, ransacked their quarters, and fired at the Massachusetts men,” said Curator Matthew Keagle. “The violent assault was the explosion of grievances over issues of class, race, and military professionalism that divided soldiers from the “south” with those from New England, and were exacerbated by alcohol and boredom in garrison at Ticonderoga.  While engaged in the same cause, the Independence of the United States, deep divisions existed between the ranks of the Revolutionary army. Fortunately, in this circumstance, the participants were able to resolve their differences for the benefit of the cause. This was not the first, nor would it be the last altercation across state lines, but it reflects how remarkable the achievement of Independence was, in the face of profound diversity between Americans.”

To learn more about this living history event, call 518-585-2821 or visit www.fortticonderoga.org.

Fort Ticonderoga: America’s Fort™
Fort Ticonderoga is an independent nonprofit educational organization and museum, which serves its mission by preserving, educating, and provoking active discussion about the past and its importance to present and future generations. It serves this mission by fostering an on-going dialogue surrounding citizens, soldiers, and nations through America’s military heritage. Welcoming visitors since 1909, it preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched 18th-century earthworks surviving in America.  Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year with an economic impact of more than $12 million annually and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year and is open for daily visitation May through October. Fort Ticonderoga is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and pursues its vision to enrich the human experience and strengthen citizenship by fostering critical thinking, historical literacy, and an appreciation of beauty. Visit www.FortTiconderoga.org for a full list of ongoing programs or call 518-585-2821. Fort Ticonderoga is located at 102 Fort Ti Road, Ticonderoga, New York.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo 1: Orderly Book from winter of 1776 -1777.  Fort Ticonderoga Museum Collection.

Photo 2: Living History Event “RIOT! Yankees vs Buckskins” presented at Fort Ticonderoga on Saturday, December 15 from 10am-4pm.

Posted in Books, Collections, Education, Exhibits, Family programs, Fort Ticonderoga, Fort Ticonderoga Staff, Life Long Learning, Living History & Material Culture, Living History Event, Museums, Programs, Public Programs, Tourist Destination, Winter Family Fun, Winter Quarters | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Christmas Riot of 1776: Overlooked Moment of American Disunity

Fort Ticonderoga Launches New Season of Programs for Winter Quarters November 2018 – April 2019 offers Unique Visitor Experiences

Fort Ticonderoga is launching a new schedule of programs during its Winter Quarters season. From now through April, visitors will be immersed in exciting living history events, engaging seminars, specialty programs, behind-the-scenes VIP Tours, and hands-on workshops. Guests will have the opportunity to explore Fort Ticonderoga during what was traditionally the “Winter Quarters” season for armies of the 18th century. Groups of 15 or more are also invited to schedule a visit to have the entire site to themselves and a dedicated historic interpreter for their tour during Winter Quarters. To learn more about the full schedule visit www.fortticonderoga.org or call 518-585-2821.

“Discover a new perspective of Ticonderoga’s epic history and stunning historic landscape during our Winter Quarters season,” said Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO. “Just as the armies of the 18th century moved into Winter Quarters during this period of the year, Fort Ticonderoga captures the story, activities, and winter-time beauty of the site. Fort Ticonderoga is leading the way for regional destinations to offer year-round experiences. From special group tours and field trips, classroom visits, incredible living history events, seminars and lectures series and a variety of other programs and new exhibitions, Fort Ticonderoga’s Winter Quarters is a must-do for residents in the region as well as the many tourists who visit the Adirondacks for its story, beauty, and wintertime activities.”

Living History Events

  • December 7 & 8, 2018: Colonel Knox is Now at Ticonderoga
    Immerse yourself in the daily life of 1775 at Ticonderoga and see how soldiers assist Henry Knox prepare for his epic journey. Stand in the very spot where Henry Knox began his Noble Train of Artillery.
  • December 15, 2018: RIOT! Yankees versus Buckskins
    Discover how cultural divisions between soldiers from New England and Pennsylvania erupted in a riot between Americans at Ticonderoga at the end of 1776 during this lively living history event.
  • January 19, 2019: Preparing for the Coming Campaign
    Witness the defining story of 1777, the last year American troops held Ticonderoga. The roar of musketry and cannon and the intricate maneuvering of soldiers take on a whole new dimension during this living history event.
  • February 16, 2019: 1775 British Garrison Event
    See how British soldiers and their families lived at Fort Ticonderoga on the eve of the American Revolution. Discover what it was like to be a British soldier, soldier’s wife, or child. Was the British Army prepared or unprepared to fight for control of Ticonderoga?
  • March 9, 2019: Battle on Snowshoes
    March out with French soldiers and their Native American allies before they spring upon Rogers’ Rangers. Experience the hectic tree-to-tree fighting in a recreated battle as the Rangers make a brave stand against superior odds, only to retreat through the deep woods. Discover the people, weapons, and stories through living history vignettes, exhibitions, and hands-on programs.

Fort Fever Series
Fort Ticonderoga’s popular wintertime Fort Fever Series returns in 2019 and features programs led by Fort Ticonderoga museum staff who will share their latest research and cutting-edge discoveries. All programs are held on Sundays at 2:00 pm in the Mars Education Center at Fort Ticonderoga. Admission is $10/person, free admission offered to Fort Ticonderoga Members and Ambassador Pass holders.

  • January 13, 2019: Half-Spanish, Part-Hungarian, & All-American: Cavalry Treatises, Saddles & Objects in Fort Ticonderoga’s Collection
    Join Vice President of Public History, Stuart Lilie, to chart the origins of the United States Cavalry through incredible objects in the Fort Ticonderoga Museum Collection. Discover the European and Middle Eastern influences that made American cavalry and saddlery unique.
  • February 10, 2019: Selective Service: Soldiers of Color in the Atlantic World
    Fort Ticonderoga Curator Matthew Keagle will explore how the armies of the early modern Atlantic World policed the boundaries of race and military service during an era of global imperial conflict. This program will provide context to the complex, and often contradictory, history of soldiers of color on both sides of the Atlantic ocean in the 18th century.
  • March 17, 2019: Remembering the Ladies: Anglo-American Women in the Lake Champlain Valley, 1759-1781
    This Women’s History Month, join Museum Registrar, Margaret Staudter, as she examines the roles of women at Ticonderoga and in the Lake Champlain Valley during times of peace and times of war. Through historical accounts, documents, and artifacts uncover the stories of women hidden in the shadows of Fort Ticonderoga’s dramatic military history.
  • April 7, 2019: Lake Champlain’s Age of Steam
    Join Director of Academic Programs, Rich Strum, for a program about the age of steam on Lake Champlain. From the first steamer that plied the waters of Lake Champlain in 1809 to the Ticonderoga that ceased operation in 1953, dozens of steamers moved passengers and freight up and down the lake, connecting communities and bringing early tourists to the region.

Winter Workshop Series
Join Fort Ticonderoga’s professional staff and tradesmen as you make your own 18th-century clothing and accoutrement during hands-on trades workshops. Each workshop includes a coat kit, sewing materials, and lunch. Pre-registration is required by calling 518-585-6190.

  • December 1-2, 2018: 1750s British Accoutrements
    Join Artificer Shoemaker, Matthew Schlicksup, to build your own 1750s British cartridge pouch, buff leather soldier strap, and swordbelt, which were common on so many British Regular Soldiers during the French & Indian War.
  • January 12-13, 2019: 1750s British Regimental Coats
    Learn the latest research on British and Provincial enlisted regimental coats as you build your own. Discover period shortcuts for these military garments, produced en masse for regimental contracts. This workshop is BYOL&B–bring your own lace and buttons—due to the specificity of these trimmings. Most facings, linings, and regimental and campaign details can be accommodated with prior notice.
  • February 9-10, 2019: Genteel Details and Epaulettes
    Learn the secrets of genteel civilian and officers’ coats. Under the instruction of Vice President of Public History, Stuart Lilie, learn and practice techniques for corded buttonholes, laced buttonholes, perfect pocket flaps, feathered edges, button stands, lining and pleats, and build samples of each to take home. On the second day, join Director of Interpretation, Nicholas Spadone, to build your own gold or silver epaulettes.
  • March 9-10, 2019: French Women’s Jackets
    Join Fort Ticonderoga Head of Costume, Nathalie Smallidge, build your own women’s short jackets, a style common in French Canada during the 1750s. The workshop will begin with a brief presentation on women’s fashion in French Canada examining both European and Native American influence and how those details could be adapted to individual tastes.

Behind-the-Scenes VIP Opportunities
This exclusive once-in-a-lifetime experience provides a unique behind-the-scenes look at Fort Ticonderoga’s world-class collections. Highlights include clothing, weapons, and personal possessions of soldiers from across the Atlantic. Learn how objects tell amazing stories of the past and how Fort Ticonderoga contextualizes its rich collection. This program takes place in the Thompson Pell Research Center. In addition to the 3-hour program, return the following day to take part in a Winter Quarters living history event, included in the cost. Advanced reservations are required by calling 518-585-1023.

  • Available dates: January 18, 2019, February 15, 2019, and March 8, 2019

Fort Ticonderoga: America’s Fort™
Welcoming visitors since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2,000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched Revolutionary War era earthworks surviving in America. As the premier place to learn more about our nation’s earliest years and America’s military heritage, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year with an economic impact of more than $12 million annually and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year, and is open for daily visitation May through October. Fort Ticonderoga is supported in part through generous donations and with some general operating support made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Posted in Collections, Education, Exhibits, Family Fun in the Adirondacks, Family programs, Fort Ticonderoga, Fort Ticonderoga Staff, Life Long Learning, Living History & Material Culture, Living History Event, Museums, Natural History, Programs, Public Programs, Tourist Destination, Winter Family Fun, Winter Quarters | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Fort Ticonderoga Launches New Season of Programs for Winter Quarters November 2018 – April 2019 offers Unique Visitor Experiences

In Honor of Veteran’s Day, Fort Ticonderoga will display one of the rarest and most significant artifacts to survive from the Revolutionary War during November 10 event

Benjamin Warner's knapsackFort Ticonderoga honors American Veterans with an exhibit open only on November 10, 2018. This exhibit will display the knapsack and accompanying note carried by Connecticut soldier, Benjamin Warner, during his service with the Continental Army and is considered one of the rarest and most fragile artifacts to survive from the Revolutionary War. As a veteran of some of the most difficult campaigns of the Revolution, Warner preserved his pack with a note to his children to keep it for posterity as a humble but lasting reminder of the sacrifices made to achieve independence and liberty.

“The ability to enhance living history with rare objects from everyday soldiers such as this exceedingly rare knapsack and a handwritten note is what makes Fort Ticonderoga best-in-class for its cultural heritage and as an international tourist destination,” said Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga’s President & CEO.

This one-time exhibit will be on display as part of a living history event at Fort Ticonderoga. Visitors will explore how British sailors and soldiers prepared for a campaign to be launched from Ticonderoga in the fall of 1781. Living history demonstrations throughout the day will focus on the range of people that fought for and supported the British Empire and their different roles in this last active campaign in the Champlain Valley of the Revolutionary War.

Highlighted programming throughout the day brings to life the technical skill of British forces and the many complicated mechanisms and practices used. Examine original British cannon in the Fort Ticonderoga collection to understand the math, science, and art of their time. Discover how sailors used ropes, levers, pulleys, and other simple machines to move heavy cannon and supplies to and from ships. Watch as oxen haul boats, supplies, and the weapons of war. Meet loyalist refugees from the nascent United States seeking security within British territory. Grapple with the same questions Americans did 237 years ago when British forces occupied Ticonderoga.  Will the British Army stay at Ticonderoga for long? Will they move further into New York, or retreat back north?

Admission to the event is $12 for the general public and free to Veterans, Fort Ticonderoga Members, Ambassador Pass holders, and children age four and under. For more information, visit www.fortticonderoga.org or call 518-585-2821.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Fort Ticonderoga: America’s Fort™

The Fort Ticonderoga Association is an independent nonprofit educational organization and museum, which serves its mission to ensure that present and future generations learn from the struggles, sacrifices, and victories that shaped the nations of North America and changed world history. It serves this mission by preserving and enhancing its historic structures, collections, gardens and landscapes; and educating the public as it learns about the history of Fort Ticonderoga. Welcoming visitors since 1909, it preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched 18th-century earthworks surviving in America.  Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year and is open for daily visitation May through October. Fort Ticonderoga is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and pursues its vision to be one of the premier cultural destinations in North America. Visit www.FortTiconderoga.org for a full list of ongoing programs or call 518-585-2821. Fort Ticonderoga is located at 102 Fort Ti Road, Ticonderoga, New York.

Photo: Copyright Fort Ticonderoga, photo credit Gavin Ashworth.

Posted in Books, Collections, Education, Exhibits, Family Fun in the Adirondacks, Fort Ticonderoga, Fort Ticonderoga Staff, Landscape, Life Long Learning, Living History & Material Culture, Living History Event, Museums, Programs, Public Programs, Tourist Destination | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on In Honor of Veteran’s Day, Fort Ticonderoga will display one of the rarest and most significant artifacts to survive from the Revolutionary War during November 10 event

FORT TICONDEROGA ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES MAJOR FEDERAL INVESTMENT AND PLANS FOR FUTURE GROWTH

Association plans fundraising campaign to support state-of-the-art museum to display world class collection

Fort Ticonderoga

Fort Ticonderoga announced today plans for a major capital campaign and collection preservation.

Aided by federal investment, announced today by Congresswoman Elise Stefanik and supported by Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, Fort Ticonderoga continues to expand its collections catalog and rediscover more pieces of our nation’s amazing treasures. Fort Ticonderoga was awarded $249,400 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services as part of a $619,630 project to inventory, catalog and store more than 30,000 items from its objects collections. This 3-year project will also aid in the updating of the online collections database recently launched by Fort Ticonderoga making its rare museum collections accessible to the world.

Additionally, Fort Ticonderoga announced it is beginning the next phase of a $70 million capital campaign to support plans to enhance the visitor experience, which includes the construction of a new state-of-the-art museum to house and display the growing collections of historical importance. The museum will serve as the premier North American military history museum, spanning the early modern era from 1609-1815.

This investment shows the strength of the organization, and why Fort Ticonderoga has gained a reputation as a world-class destination important to our nation’s history. This is the most aggressive expansion in the history of Fort Ticonderoga and will be one of the largest economic development projects in the North Country.

“In the last decade, Fort Ticonderoga has experienced significant growth in visitors, economic impact, and educational reach,” said Beth Hill, President & CEO of Fort Ticonderoga. “We continue to offer an unmatched glimpse into the past through our collections, living history programs, and academic programming on the very grounds where freedom was advanced. We’re excited to move forward with these plans to ensure that people can have access to our singular collections and experience all that Fort Ticonderoga has to offer for generations to come.”

This investment comes on the heels of a $2.45 million grant awarded to Fort Ticonderoga by New York State for the preservation and adaptive re-use of the Pavilion, the historic home on the Fort Ticonderoga campus. The Pavilion was built in 1826 and is considered one of America’s first summer homes.

The restoration project, expected to be complete in 2020, will save a national treasure while expanding Fort Ticonderoga’s capacity as a national cultural destination. The future Pavilion will include expanded visitor amenities, conference center capacity, and new educational and exhibition space.

“I’m proud to help secure nearly $250,000 in federal funding through the Institute of Museum and Library Services’ Museums for America Grant program for Fort Ticonderoga’s newly announced expansion,”  said Congresswoman Stefanik. “Our region thrives on the tourism and commerce we generate from our unique historical heritage, and Fort Ticonderoga is a pillar of our area’s culture. As a child, I remember spending many days at Fort Ticonderoga with my brother and parents, exploring the grounds and watching historical reenactments. The expansion announced today is great news not only for our tourism economy but for the countless families like my own that will be enriched through the educational programs at Fort Ticonderoga. I’ll keep working in Congress to ensure our North Country history is shared for generations to come.”

“Fort Ticonderoga shaped world history,” said New York State Senator Betty Little.  “I’ve been honored to support the fort in many different ways and am very pleased to join in today’s announcement of funding that will help shape Fort Ticonderoga’s future.  Preserving the fort and creating a more enriching experience is a true team effort that will benefit our region for decades to come.  Kudos to Congresswoman Stefanik, Beth Hill, the dedicated members of the board of trustees and everyone else who is playing a role in making this historic jewel shine even brighter.”

“The preservation of this historical collection will allow Fort Ticonderoga the ability to provide a greater understanding of the history and rich tradition the Adirondacks has amassed over the years,” said New York State Assemblyman Dan Stec. “Sharing this piece of history with future generations will enrich the lives of many visitors and ensure the viability of this world-class museum.”

“Fort Ticonderoga is one of America’s greatest historic treasures and one of the North Country’s greatest tourist attractions,” said Garry Douglas, President of the North Country Chamber of Commerce and Co-Chair of the North Country Regional Economic Development Council. “This latest federal support for the fort’s collections and assets is another building block in the continuing enhancement of Fort Ti as an economic asset to the entire region. We thank Congresswoman Stefanik, as well as Senators Schumer and Gillibrand, for their steadfast support for the fort, and we know that great things lie ahead thanks to this kind of federal partnership.”

This was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, grant # MA-30-18-0166-18

About IMLS
The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s libraries and museums. We advance, support, and empower America’s museums, libraries, and related organizations through grantmaking, research, and policy development. Our vision is a nation where museums and libraries work together to transform the lives of individuals and communities. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook (link is external) and Twitter (link is external).

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Fort Ticonderoga: America’s Fort™
Welcoming visitors since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2,000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched Revolutionary War era earthworks surviving in America. As the premier place to learn more about our nation’s earliest years and America’s military heritage, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year with an economic impact of more than $12 million annually and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year, and is open for daily visitation May through October. Fort Ticonderoga is supported in part through generous donations and with some general operating support made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo Credit: Copyright Fort Ticonderoga, Photographer Carl Heilman II

Posted in Boat Tours, Books, Collections, Education, Exhibits, Fall Foliage, Family Fun in the Adirondacks, Family programs, Fort Ticonderoga, Fort Ticonderoga Staff, Grant, Life Long Learning, Living History & Material Culture, Museums, Natural History, Programs, Public Programs, Special Award, Tourist Destination | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on FORT TICONDEROGA ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES MAJOR FEDERAL INVESTMENT AND PLANS FOR FUTURE GROWTH

Explore Fort Ticonderoga’s Heroic Corn Maze at Night!

Kids with flashlights in corn mazeDiscover fall fun of historic proportions at Fort Ticonderoga’s Maze by Moonlight Friday, October 26 and Saturday, October 27. Navigate through the six-acres of towering corn stalks at night! Visitors will find clues connected to Fort Ticonderoga’s story as they make their way through the maze in the blanket of darkness. Will Fort Ticonderoga’s unexplained and ghostly past find you in the maze? Bring your flashlight and find out!

The maze, with a NEW 2018 design is divided into two phases, giving guests the chance to gain confidence in the smaller maze before tackling the main maze. The average journey will take from twenty minutes for the first phase and up to an hour for the second phase.

Kids in corn maze with flashlights held up to their facesThe cost of this fun fall nighttime experience is $10 per person; tickets are available at the door. Members of Fort Ticonderoga, Ticonderoga Ambassador Pass Holders, and children age four and under are admitted free of charge. The admissions booth and the corn maze open at 7:00 pm; last ticket sold at 9:00 pm, the maze will close at 10:00 pm. For more information, call (518) 585-2821 or visit www.fortticonderoga.org.

Fort Ticonderoga: America’s Fort™
The Fort Ticonderoga Association is an independent nonprofit educational organization and museum, which serves its mission to ensure that present and future generations learn from the struggles, sacrifices, and victories that shaped the nations of North America and changed world history. It serves thisCorn maze mission by preserving and enhancing its historic structures, collections, gardens and landscapes; and educating the public as it learns about the history of Fort Ticonderoga. Welcoming visitors since 1909, it preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched 18th-century earthworks surviving in America.  Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits new throughout the year and is open for daily visitation May through October. Fort Ticonderoga is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and pursues its vision to be one of the premier cultural destinations in North America. Visit www.FortTiconderoga.org for a full list of ongoing programs or call 518-585-2821. Fort Ticonderoga is located at 102 Fort Ti Road, Ticonderoga, New York.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

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Fort Ticonderoga Makes Major Land Acquisition to Preserve East Face of Mount Defiance

Acquisition in partnership with Open Space Institute ensures this
National Historic Landmark will be forever protected47 acres on the east face of Mount Defiance

The Fort Ticonderoga Association today announced that it has acquired 47 acres on the east face of Mount Defiance, ensuring the entire historically important mountain will be forever protected. The acquisition was made possible through the partnership with the Open Space Institute (OSI) which provided a $46,000 grant for the purchase and related expenses.

“Fort Ticonderoga has a long history of land conservation and historic preservation dating back to 1820 when William Ferris Pell purchased the garrison grounds and placed a fence around the fort ruins marking the earliest act of preservation by a private individual in America,” said Beth L. Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO. “This recent acquisition is an important addition to our 2000-acre historic campus and will preserve the historic land and its natural beauty forever.”

“Fort Ticonderoga is one of New York’s most valuable historic resources, connecting families to a priceless heritage.  OSI is proud to have helped protect this significant, storied, and visually stunning area,” said Kim Elliman, OSI’s President and CEO.

Mount Defiance is one of Fort Ticonderoga’s most important historic features and provides more than 75,000 visitors the opportunity to visualize and understand why Ticonderoga was the key to the continent in the 18th century. Best known historically for its role in the British capture of Ticonderoga in 1777, the mountain was utilized in some degree by every army who occupied Ticonderoga. Today, the summit of Mount Defiance is part of the Fort Ticonderoga experience, offering a unique vantage point of the epic military landscape as visitors discover how this mountain shaped America’s history.

About the Open Space Institute

The Open Space Institute protects scenic, natural and historic landscapes to provide public enjoyment, conserve habitat and working lands and sustain communities.  Founded in 1974 to protect significant landscapes in New York State, OSI has been a partner in the protection of nearly 2.2 million acres in North America.  A leader in environmental conservation, OSI leverages their knowledge and attracts resources for strategic investments to make innovative land conservation happen.  Visit OSI online at www.openspaceinstitute.org

Fort Ticonderoga: America’s Fort™
Welcoming visitors since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2,000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched Revolutionary War era earthworks surviving in America. As the premier place to learn more about our nation’s earliest years and America’s military heritage, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year with an economic impact of more than $12 million annually and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year, and is open for daily visitation May through October.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo: View of Mt. Defiance from Fort Ticonderoga. Credit: Fort Ticonderoga

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ATTENTION FALL FOLIAGE LOVERS: CARILLON BOAT CRUISES EXTENDED AT FORT TICONDEROGA

Spectacular Bon Voyage Cruise on October 21 includes bottomless Mimosas and Bloody Marys

Carillon boatDue to popular demand, daily boat cruises on Fort Ticonderoga’s Carillon have been extended until October 20! Originally slated to close for the season on October 14, the Carillon will operate for an additional week providing new opportunities to experience the renowned Adirondacks’ Fall foliage season from the waters of Lake Champlain.

In addition, Fort Ticonderoga announced details for a spectacular season-ending Bon Voyage cruise on October 21. Visitors will have one last chance to savor the spectacular Fall foliage aboard the Carillon on its final cruise of the season as it charts its course south on Lake Champlain for the winter. Sip on bottomless Mimosas and Bloody Marys on this unforgettable adventure- including a passage through Lock 12 in Whitehall!

“The demand to experience the Fall foliage around Lake Champlain aboard the Carillon is exceeding our wildest expectations so we’ve added another week of cruises so everybody has a chance to enjoy our unmatched natural beauty,” said Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO Beth Hill. “Even with an additional week, space is extremely limited and filling up quickly. Make your reservation today to ensure your spot on this unforgettable Adirondack experience.”

Cruises depart daily at 1:00 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. and provide gorgeous, sweeping views of Vermont’s Green Mountains and New York’s Adirondack Mountains during a 90-minute narrated boat tour aboard the Carillon. Let our friendly and experienced staff be your guide to Lake Champlain’s centuries of stirring maritime heritage with panoramic vistas around you and a sonar view of shipwrecks below. Embark on this unforgettable experience for visitors of all ages!

For more information or to make your reservation on the daily or Bon Voyage cruise, call 518-585-2821 or visit www.fortticonderoga.org.

Fort Ticonderoga: America’s Fort™

Welcoming visitors since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga preserves North America’s largest 18th-century artillery collection, 2,000 acres of historic landscape on Lake Champlain, and Carillon Battlefield, and the largest series of untouched Revolutionary War era earthworks surviving in America. As the premier place to learn more about our nation’s earliest years and America’s military heritage, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 75,000 visitors each year with an economic impact of more than $12 million annually and offers programs, historic interpretation, boat cruises, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year, and is open for daily visitation May through October. Fort Ticonderoga is supported in part through generous donations and with some general operating support made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo copyright Fort Ticonderoga

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